Fungal myocarditis.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incidence of invasive fungal disease has dramatically increased over the past few decades corresponding to the rising number of immunocompromised patients. The major risk factors for severe fungal disease include administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics, corticosteroids and cytotoxic agents, invasive medical procedures, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Invasive fungal infections often affect multiple organs, and involvement of the myocardium frequently occurs in disseminated disease. Premortem diagnosis of fungal myocarditis is difficult since clinical findings of myocardial involvement are often absent or ambiguous and blood cultures are often negative. The major fungal pathogens responsible for myocardial infection and the clinical settings in which they occur are reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFrontiers in Bioscience
Volume7
StatePublished - 2002

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Mycoses
Myocarditis
Cytotoxins
Immunocompromised Host
Virus Diseases
Myocardium
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
HIV
Pathogens
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Viruses
Incidence
Blood
Infection
Blood Culture
Invasive Fungal Infections

Cite this

Fungal myocarditis. / Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

In: Frontiers in Bioscience, Vol. 7, 2002.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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