Functional deficits of the attentional networks in autism

Jin Fan, Silvia Bernardi, Nicholas T. Van Dam, Evdokia Anagnostou, Xiaosi Gu, Laura Martin, Yunsoo Park, Xun Liu, Alexander Kolevzon, Latha Soorya, David Grodberg, Eric Hollander, Patrick R. Hof

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Attentional dysfunction is among the most consistent observations of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the neural nature of this deficit in ASD is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to identify the neurobehavioral correlates of attentional dysfunction in ASD. We used the Attention Network Test-Revised and functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine alerting, orienting, and executive control functions, as well as the neural substrates underlying these attentional functions in unmedicated, high-functioning adults with ASD (n = 12) and matched healthy controls (HC, n = 12). Compared with HC, individuals with ASD showed increased error rates in alerting and executive control, accompanied by lower activity in the mid-frontal gyrus and the caudate nucleus for alerting, and by the absence of significant functional activation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) for executive control. In addition, greater behavioral deficiency in executive control in ASD was correlated with less functional activation of the ACC. These findings of behavioral and neural abnormalities in alerting and executive control of attention in ASD may suggest core attentional deficits, which require further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-660
Number of pages14
JournalBrain and Behavior
Volume2
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Executive Function
Gyrus Cinguli
Caudate Nucleus
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Alerting
  • Anterior cingulate cortex
  • Attentional networks
  • Autism
  • Executive control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Fan, J., Bernardi, S., Van Dam, N. T., Anagnostou, E., Gu, X., Martin, L., ... Hof, P. R. (2012). Functional deficits of the attentional networks in autism. Brain and Behavior, 2(5), 647-660. https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.90

Functional deficits of the attentional networks in autism. / Fan, Jin; Bernardi, Silvia; Van Dam, Nicholas T.; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Gu, Xiaosi; Martin, Laura; Park, Yunsoo; Liu, Xun; Kolevzon, Alexander; Soorya, Latha; Grodberg, David; Hollander, Eric; Hof, Patrick R.

In: Brain and Behavior, Vol. 2, No. 5, 09.2012, p. 647-660.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fan, J, Bernardi, S, Van Dam, NT, Anagnostou, E, Gu, X, Martin, L, Park, Y, Liu, X, Kolevzon, A, Soorya, L, Grodberg, D, Hollander, E & Hof, PR 2012, 'Functional deficits of the attentional networks in autism', Brain and Behavior, vol. 2, no. 5, pp. 647-660. https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.90
Fan J, Bernardi S, Van Dam NT, Anagnostou E, Gu X, Martin L et al. Functional deficits of the attentional networks in autism. Brain and Behavior. 2012 Sep;2(5):647-660. https://doi.org/10.1002/brb3.90
Fan, Jin ; Bernardi, Silvia ; Van Dam, Nicholas T. ; Anagnostou, Evdokia ; Gu, Xiaosi ; Martin, Laura ; Park, Yunsoo ; Liu, Xun ; Kolevzon, Alexander ; Soorya, Latha ; Grodberg, David ; Hollander, Eric ; Hof, Patrick R. / Functional deficits of the attentional networks in autism. In: Brain and Behavior. 2012 ; Vol. 2, No. 5. pp. 647-660.
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