From Treatment Response to Recovery: A Realistic Goal in OCD

Elisabetta Burchi, Eric Hollander, Stefano Pallanti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite longitudinal studies reporting symptomatic remission rates ranging from 32% to 70%, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is considered a persistent and very disabling disorder. However, these studies suggest that recovery can be a realistic goal for a subgroup of the Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder population and that a clear definition of recovery is timely in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. The aim of this paper is to discuss the dimensions of and propose an operational definition of recovery in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Considering the impact generated by the definition of recovery for other mental disorders, this article discusses how this concept may shape the future of research and clinical practice in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Ultimately, the hope is that the management of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder may parallel, and expand upon, some of the current approaches implemented in the care of schizophrenia, so that early diagnosis, stepped-care techniques, and a personalized approach can be used to create recovery-oriented treatment programs and influence policy making for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1007-1013
Number of pages7
JournalThe international journal of neuropsychopharmacology
Volume21
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Hope
Policy Making
Mental Disorders
Longitudinal Studies
Early Diagnosis
Schizophrenia
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

From Treatment Response to Recovery : A Realistic Goal in OCD. / Burchi, Elisabetta; Hollander, Eric; Pallanti, Stefano.

In: The international journal of neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 21, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 1007-1013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burchi, Elisabetta ; Hollander, Eric ; Pallanti, Stefano. / From Treatment Response to Recovery : A Realistic Goal in OCD. In: The international journal of neuropsychopharmacology. 2018 ; Vol. 21, No. 11. pp. 1007-1013.
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