Forgiveness of non-adherence to HIV-1 antiretroviral therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Superior adherence to HIV-1 antiretroviral therapy is a mainstay of successful HIV management. Studies performed in the early era of highly active antiretroviral therapy demonstrated the need for ≥95% adherence in order to achieve and sustain viral suppression. High rates of viral suppression have been observed at more moderate levels of adherence with newer antiretroviral regimens. The term 'forgiveness' is being used to describe the ability of a regimen to achieve and sustain viral suppression, despite suboptimal adherence. A variety of pharmacological, viral and host properties determine the level of forgiveness of any specific regimen. As the choice of treatment options continues to expand, forgiveness of non-adherence is likely to emerge as an increasingly important factor in therapeutic decision-making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)769-773
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

Forgiveness
HIV-1
Aptitude
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Decision Making
Therapeutics
HIV
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • Compliance
  • Resistance
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Forgiveness of non-adherence to HIV-1 antiretroviral therapy. / Shuter, Jonathan.

In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Vol. 61, No. 4, 04.2008, p. 769-773.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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