Five year outcomes of Boston type I keratoprosthesis as primary versus secondary penetrating corneal procedure in a matched case control study

Kai B. Kang, Faris I. Karas, Ruju Rai, Joelle A. Hallak, Joann J. Kang, Jose de la Cruz, Maria S. Cortina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite improved retention and reduced complication rates paving the way for the current expansion of applications and surge in prevalence for the Boston type I Keratoprosthesis (KPro), the most frequent indication for its implantation today remains prior graft failure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of primary KPro and compare to secondary implantation in a matched cohort study. This study included patients who underwent KPro implantation in a single center by two surgeons between July 2008 and October 2014. All eyes with KPro implantation as the primary procedure with a minimum follow up of 12 months were matched with eyes with same preoperative diagnoses that underwent secondary KPro implantation. Main outcomes included visual acuity and device retention. A total of 56 eyes were included with 28 eyes in each group. Mean follow up was 5.0 years for both groups. Twenty-nine percent (8) of the eyes in the primary group had a diagnosis of chemical or thermal injuries, 25% (7) aniridia, 18% (5) autoimmune disease, 4% (1) infectious keratitis/neurotrophic cornea, 7% (2) gelatinous corneal dystrophy, 7% (2) ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia/limbal stem cell deficiency, and 11% (3) uveitis/hypotony. Sixty-one percent (17) of the eyes in the primary group and 39% (11) in the secondary group maintained a final best-corrected visual acuity of 20/200 or better at a mean follow up of 5.0 years; the probability of maintaining best-corrected vision is 0.83 and 0.49 for primary and secondary groups at 5.0 years (p = 0.02). There is no statistically significant difference between groups in device retention (p = 0.22) or postoperative complication rates (p >0.05). This study demonstrates that Boston KPro implantation may be successful as a primary procedure in patients at high risk of failure with traditional penetrating keratoplasty. The device has a good long-term retention rate and visual outcomes are promising however a larger study is needed for more definitive results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0192381
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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