Fertility desires and the feasibility of contraception counseling among genital fistula patients in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo

Nerys Benfield, Rogatien M. Kinsindja, Christophe Kimona, Maurice Masoda, Joseph Ndume, Jody Steinauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the fertility and contraceptive desires of genital fistula patients in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and to evaluate the impact of contraceptive counseling and its effect on contraceptive knowledge and use. Methods: Group contraceptive counseling was offered to fistula patients at HEAL Africa Hospital between February and May 2010. Fertility desires and contraceptive knowledge were assessed via verbally administered questionnaires before and after counseling, and use of modern contraceptive methods was tracked. Results: Of the 61 participants, 22/34 (64.7%) of those who desired children wanted to wait at least 1 year after repair before attempting pregnancy. Overall, 31/58 (53.4%) women had heard of birth control, although only 15 (24.6%) knew any specific methods, and none had ever used contraception. After counseling, all participants could recall 1 or more methods. Of the 25 participants discharged over the subsequent 3 months, 5 (20.0%) and 3 additional fistula patients selected a modern method of contraception. Conclusion: Desire for contraception and birth spacing among women with fistula is significant. Basic group contraception counseling and access are feasible and lead to increased contraceptive knowledge and use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-267
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume114
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Contraception
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Genital fistula
  • Obstetric fistula

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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