Feedforward and feedback interactions between visual cortical areas use different population activity patterns

João D. Semedo, Anna I. Jasper, Amin Zandvakili, Aravind Krishna, Amir Aschner, Christian K. Machens, Adam Kohn, Byron M. Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Brain function relies on the coordination of activity across multiple, recurrently connected brain areas. For instance, sensory information encoded in early sensory areas is relayed to, and further processed by, higher cortical areas and then fed back. However, the way in which feedforward and feedback signaling interact with one another is incompletely understood. Here we investigate this question by leveraging simultaneous neuronal population recordings in early and midlevel visual areas (V1–V2 and V1–V4). Using a dimensionality reduction approach, we find that population interactions are feedforward-dominated shortly after stimulus onset and feedback-dominated during spontaneous activity. The population activity patterns most correlated across areas were distinct during feedforward- and feedback-dominated periods. These results suggest that feedforward and feedback signaling rely on separate “channels”, which allows feedback signals to not directly affect activity that is fed forward.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1099
JournalNature communications
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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