Family Environment and the Metabolic Syndrome: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (SCAS)

Frank J. Penedo, Carrie E. Brintz, Maria M. LLabre, William Arguelles, Carmen R. Isasi, Elva M. Arredondo, Elena L. Navas-Nacher, Krista M. Perreira, Hector M. González, Carlos J. Rodriguez, Martha Daviglus, Neil Schneiderman, Linda C. Gallo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Very limited work has evaluated associations of sociocultural processes with prevalence of the MetS. Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate associations between family environment (cohesion/conflict) and the MetS, in a multi-site sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. Methods: A total of 3278 participants from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos underwent a clinical exam and completed psychosocial measures including family environment (cohesion and conflict) as part of the Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Results: The association between family environment and the MetS was moderated by sex. Among all women, higher family conflict was associated with MetS prevalence. Results by ancestry group showed that only among Cuban women, higher conflict was associated with the MetS, whereas only among Dominican men, greater cohesion was associated with the MetS. Conclusions: The family context may be a sociocultural protective or risk factor among Hispanics/Latinos in terms of MetS risk, but these associations may vary by sex and Hispanic background.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)793-801
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 12 2015

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Health
Family Conflict
Cardiovascular Diseases
Conflict (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Cohesion
  • Conflict
  • Family environment
  • Hispanics-Latinos
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Family Environment and the Metabolic Syndrome : Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (SCAS). / Penedo, Frank J.; Brintz, Carrie E.; LLabre, Maria M.; Arguelles, William; Isasi, Carmen R.; Arredondo, Elva M.; Navas-Nacher, Elena L.; Perreira, Krista M.; González, Hector M.; Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Daviglus, Martha; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 6, 12.06.2015, p. 793-801.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Penedo, FJ, Brintz, CE, LLabre, MM, Arguelles, W, Isasi, CR, Arredondo, EM, Navas-Nacher, EL, Perreira, KM, González, HM, Rodriguez, CJ, Daviglus, M, Schneiderman, N & Gallo, LC 2015, 'Family Environment and the Metabolic Syndrome: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (SCAS)', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 49, no. 6, pp. 793-801. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-015-9713-4
Penedo, Frank J. ; Brintz, Carrie E. ; LLabre, Maria M. ; Arguelles, William ; Isasi, Carmen R. ; Arredondo, Elva M. ; Navas-Nacher, Elena L. ; Perreira, Krista M. ; González, Hector M. ; Rodriguez, Carlos J. ; Daviglus, Martha ; Schneiderman, Neil ; Gallo, Linda C. / Family Environment and the Metabolic Syndrome : Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (SCAS). In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 49, No. 6. pp. 793-801.
@article{b5295f79005040cf8f03825882361635,
title = "Family Environment and the Metabolic Syndrome: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (SCAS)",
abstract = "Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Very limited work has evaluated associations of sociocultural processes with prevalence of the MetS. Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate associations between family environment (cohesion/conflict) and the MetS, in a multi-site sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. Methods: A total of 3278 participants from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos underwent a clinical exam and completed psychosocial measures including family environment (cohesion and conflict) as part of the Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Results: The association between family environment and the MetS was moderated by sex. Among all women, higher family conflict was associated with MetS prevalence. Results by ancestry group showed that only among Cuban women, higher conflict was associated with the MetS, whereas only among Dominican men, greater cohesion was associated with the MetS. Conclusions: The family context may be a sociocultural protective or risk factor among Hispanics/Latinos in terms of MetS risk, but these associations may vary by sex and Hispanic background.",
keywords = "Cohesion, Conflict, Family environment, Hispanics-Latinos, Metabolic syndrome, Sex",
author = "Penedo, {Frank J.} and Brintz, {Carrie E.} and LLabre, {Maria M.} and William Arguelles and Isasi, {Carmen R.} and Arredondo, {Elva M.} and Navas-Nacher, {Elena L.} and Perreira, {Krista M.} and Gonz{\'a}lez, {Hector M.} and Rodriguez, {Carlos J.} and Martha Daviglus and Neil Schneiderman and Gallo, {Linda C.}",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1007/s12160-015-9713-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "793--801",
journal = "Annals of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "0883-6612",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Family Environment and the Metabolic Syndrome

T2 - Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (SCAS)

AU - Penedo, Frank J.

AU - Brintz, Carrie E.

AU - LLabre, Maria M.

AU - Arguelles, William

AU - Isasi, Carmen R.

AU - Arredondo, Elva M.

AU - Navas-Nacher, Elena L.

AU - Perreira, Krista M.

AU - González, Hector M.

AU - Rodriguez, Carlos J.

AU - Daviglus, Martha

AU - Schneiderman, Neil

AU - Gallo, Linda C.

PY - 2015/6/12

Y1 - 2015/6/12

N2 - Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Very limited work has evaluated associations of sociocultural processes with prevalence of the MetS. Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate associations between family environment (cohesion/conflict) and the MetS, in a multi-site sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. Methods: A total of 3278 participants from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos underwent a clinical exam and completed psychosocial measures including family environment (cohesion and conflict) as part of the Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Results: The association between family environment and the MetS was moderated by sex. Among all women, higher family conflict was associated with MetS prevalence. Results by ancestry group showed that only among Cuban women, higher conflict was associated with the MetS, whereas only among Dominican men, greater cohesion was associated with the MetS. Conclusions: The family context may be a sociocultural protective or risk factor among Hispanics/Latinos in terms of MetS risk, but these associations may vary by sex and Hispanic background.

AB - Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Very limited work has evaluated associations of sociocultural processes with prevalence of the MetS. Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate associations between family environment (cohesion/conflict) and the MetS, in a multi-site sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. Methods: A total of 3278 participants from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos underwent a clinical exam and completed psychosocial measures including family environment (cohesion and conflict) as part of the Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Results: The association between family environment and the MetS was moderated by sex. Among all women, higher family conflict was associated with MetS prevalence. Results by ancestry group showed that only among Cuban women, higher conflict was associated with the MetS, whereas only among Dominican men, greater cohesion was associated with the MetS. Conclusions: The family context may be a sociocultural protective or risk factor among Hispanics/Latinos in terms of MetS risk, but these associations may vary by sex and Hispanic background.

KW - Cohesion

KW - Conflict

KW - Family environment

KW - Hispanics-Latinos

KW - Metabolic syndrome

KW - Sex

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84946501197&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84946501197&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12160-015-9713-4

DO - 10.1007/s12160-015-9713-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 26068057

AN - SCOPUS:84946501197

VL - 49

SP - 793

EP - 801

JO - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

JF - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 0883-6612

IS - 6

ER -