Familial clustering of breast and prostate cancer and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative Study

Jennifer L. Beebe-Dimmer, Cecilia Yee, Michele L. Cote, Nancie Petrucelli, Nynikka Palmer, Cathryn Bock, Dorothy Lane, Ilir Agalliu, Marcia L. Stefanick, Michael S. Simon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND Evidence suggests that the risk of breast and prostate cancer is increased among those with a family history of the same disease and particularly among first-degree relatives. However, less is known about the relationship between breast and prostate cancer within families and particularly among minority populations. METHODS Analyses of participants in the Women's Health Initiative observational cohort who were free of breast cancer at the time of their baseline examination were conducted. Subjects were followed for breast cancer through August 31, 2009. A Cox proportional hazards regression modeling approach was used to estimate the risk of breast cancer associated with a family history of prostate cancer, breast cancer, and both among first-degree relatives. RESULTS There were 78,171 eligible participants, and 3506 breast cancer cases were diagnosed during the study period. A family history of prostate cancer was associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk after adjustments for confounders (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.26). In a separate analysis examining the joint impact of both cancers, a family history of both breast and prostate cancer was associated with a 78% increase in breast cancer risk (aHR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.45-2.19). Risk estimates associated with a family history of both breast and prostate cancer were higher among African American women (aHR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.09-5.02) versus white women (aHR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.33-2.08). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that prostate cancer diagnosed among first-degree family members increases a woman's risk of developing breast cancer. Future studies are needed to determine the relative contributions of genes and a shared environment to the risk for both cancers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1265-1272
Number of pages8
JournalCancer
Volume121
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Women's Health
Cluster Analysis
Breast Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Familial Prostate cancer
Familial Breast Cancer
Risk Adjustment
African Americans
Neoplasms
Joints

Keywords

  • African American
  • aggregation
  • epidemiology
  • family history
  • genetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Beebe-Dimmer, J. L., Yee, C., Cote, M. L., Petrucelli, N., Palmer, N., Bock, C., ... Simon, M. S. (2015). Familial clustering of breast and prostate cancer and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative Study. Cancer, 121(8), 1265-1272. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.29075

Familial clustering of breast and prostate cancer and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative Study. / Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L.; Yee, Cecilia; Cote, Michele L.; Petrucelli, Nancie; Palmer, Nynikka; Bock, Cathryn; Lane, Dorothy; Agalliu, Ilir; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Simon, Michael S.

In: Cancer, Vol. 121, No. 8, 01.04.2015, p. 1265-1272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beebe-Dimmer, JL, Yee, C, Cote, ML, Petrucelli, N, Palmer, N, Bock, C, Lane, D, Agalliu, I, Stefanick, ML & Simon, MS 2015, 'Familial clustering of breast and prostate cancer and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative Study', Cancer, vol. 121, no. 8, pp. 1265-1272. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.29075
Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L. ; Yee, Cecilia ; Cote, Michele L. ; Petrucelli, Nancie ; Palmer, Nynikka ; Bock, Cathryn ; Lane, Dorothy ; Agalliu, Ilir ; Stefanick, Marcia L. ; Simon, Michael S. / Familial clustering of breast and prostate cancer and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative Study. In: Cancer. 2015 ; Vol. 121, No. 8. pp. 1265-1272.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND Evidence suggests that the risk of breast and prostate cancer is increased among those with a family history of the same disease and particularly among first-degree relatives. However, less is known about the relationship between breast and prostate cancer within families and particularly among minority populations. METHODS Analyses of participants in the Women's Health Initiative observational cohort who were free of breast cancer at the time of their baseline examination were conducted. Subjects were followed for breast cancer through August 31, 2009. A Cox proportional hazards regression modeling approach was used to estimate the risk of breast cancer associated with a family history of prostate cancer, breast cancer, and both among first-degree relatives. RESULTS There were 78,171 eligible participants, and 3506 breast cancer cases were diagnosed during the study period. A family history of prostate cancer was associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk after adjustments for confounders (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.14; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.26). In a separate analysis examining the joint impact of both cancers, a family history of both breast and prostate cancer was associated with a 78{\%} increase in breast cancer risk (aHR, 1.78; 95{\%} CI, 1.45-2.19). Risk estimates associated with a family history of both breast and prostate cancer were higher among African American women (aHR, 2.34; 95{\%} CI, 1.09-5.02) versus white women (aHR, 1.66; 95{\%} CI, 1.33-2.08). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that prostate cancer diagnosed among first-degree family members increases a woman's risk of developing breast cancer. Future studies are needed to determine the relative contributions of genes and a shared environment to the risk for both cancers.",
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T1 - Familial clustering of breast and prostate cancer and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative Study

AU - Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L.

AU - Yee, Cecilia

AU - Cote, Michele L.

AU - Petrucelli, Nancie

AU - Palmer, Nynikka

AU - Bock, Cathryn

AU - Lane, Dorothy

AU - Agalliu, Ilir

AU - Stefanick, Marcia L.

AU - Simon, Michael S.

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N2 - BACKGROUND Evidence suggests that the risk of breast and prostate cancer is increased among those with a family history of the same disease and particularly among first-degree relatives. However, less is known about the relationship between breast and prostate cancer within families and particularly among minority populations. METHODS Analyses of participants in the Women's Health Initiative observational cohort who were free of breast cancer at the time of their baseline examination were conducted. Subjects were followed for breast cancer through August 31, 2009. A Cox proportional hazards regression modeling approach was used to estimate the risk of breast cancer associated with a family history of prostate cancer, breast cancer, and both among first-degree relatives. RESULTS There were 78,171 eligible participants, and 3506 breast cancer cases were diagnosed during the study period. A family history of prostate cancer was associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk after adjustments for confounders (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.26). In a separate analysis examining the joint impact of both cancers, a family history of both breast and prostate cancer was associated with a 78% increase in breast cancer risk (aHR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.45-2.19). Risk estimates associated with a family history of both breast and prostate cancer were higher among African American women (aHR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.09-5.02) versus white women (aHR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.33-2.08). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that prostate cancer diagnosed among first-degree family members increases a woman's risk of developing breast cancer. Future studies are needed to determine the relative contributions of genes and a shared environment to the risk for both cancers.

AB - BACKGROUND Evidence suggests that the risk of breast and prostate cancer is increased among those with a family history of the same disease and particularly among first-degree relatives. However, less is known about the relationship between breast and prostate cancer within families and particularly among minority populations. METHODS Analyses of participants in the Women's Health Initiative observational cohort who were free of breast cancer at the time of their baseline examination were conducted. Subjects were followed for breast cancer through August 31, 2009. A Cox proportional hazards regression modeling approach was used to estimate the risk of breast cancer associated with a family history of prostate cancer, breast cancer, and both among first-degree relatives. RESULTS There were 78,171 eligible participants, and 3506 breast cancer cases were diagnosed during the study period. A family history of prostate cancer was associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk after adjustments for confounders (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.26). In a separate analysis examining the joint impact of both cancers, a family history of both breast and prostate cancer was associated with a 78% increase in breast cancer risk (aHR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.45-2.19). Risk estimates associated with a family history of both breast and prostate cancer were higher among African American women (aHR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.09-5.02) versus white women (aHR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.33-2.08). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that prostate cancer diagnosed among first-degree family members increases a woman's risk of developing breast cancer. Future studies are needed to determine the relative contributions of genes and a shared environment to the risk for both cancers.

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