Failure rates and clinical outcomes after treatment for long-head biceps brachii tendon pathology: a comparison of three treatment types

Jonathan D. Hughes, Christopher M. Gibbs, Mauricio Drummond, Ravi Vaswani, Caroline Ayinon, Edna Fongod, Brian M. Godshaw, Adam Popchak, Bryson P. Lesniak, Albert Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hypothesis/Background: Treatment options for the biceps brachii tendon include tenotomy, arthroscopic tenodesis, and open tenodesis. Few studies to date have compared all treatment options in the context of a rotator cuff repair. Methods: A retrospective review of 100 patients who underwent arthroscopic supraspinatus repair between 2013 and 2018 with a minimum of one-year follow-up was performed. Patients were separated into the following 4 groups: (1) 57 had isolated supraspinatus repair with no biceps tendon surgery (SSP); (2) 16 had supraspinatus repair and biceps tenotomy; (3) 18 had supraspinatus repair and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis; (4) 9 had supraspinatus repair and an open biceps tenodesis (SSP + OT). The primary outcome was operative time. The secondary outcomes were cost analysis, complications, patient-reported outcome measures, range of motion, and strength testing. Results: The operative time for the SSP + OT group was significantly longer than that of the SSP group (P < .05) but was not significantly longer than that of the other groups. The cost for the SSP group was significantly less than the cost for the SSP + OT and supraspinatus repair and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis groups (P < .05 for both), whereas the cost for the supraspinatus repair and biceps tenotomy group was significantly less than the cost for the SSP + OT group (P < .05). There were no significant differences between groups for complications, all patient-reported outcome measues, all range of motion, and all strength parameters. Discussion/Conclusion: Operative time is the longest in open biceps tenodesis and is significantly longer than that of isolated supraspinatus repair. No significant differences in operative times or costs were identified in patients undergoing arthroscopic vs. open biceps tenodesis. All patients, irrespective of the type of biceps tendon procedure, had excellent clinical and functional outcomes at least one year after surgery. There was no difference in clinical or functional outcomes, or complications, among the 4 groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)630-635
Number of pages6
JournalJSES International
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Arthroscopic
  • Biceps tendon
  • Level III
  • Open
  • Outcomes
  • Retrospective Cohort Comparison
  • Subpectoral
  • Tenodesis
  • Treatment Study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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