Facial dyskinesias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The face is prominently or exclusively involved in several involuntary movement disorders, called 'facial dyskinesias', in addition to the common buccolingual form of tardive dyskinesia. This review describes the appearance of the most frequently occurring facial dyskinesias: chorea, dystonia, tremor, and tics. Some new treatments are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-269
Number of pages7
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume30
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Dyskinesias
Tics
Chorea
Dystonia
Movement Disorders
Tremor
Involuntary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Facial dyskinesias. / Kaufman, David Myland.

In: Psychosomatics, Vol. 30, No. 3, 1989, p. 263-269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaufman, DM 1989, 'Facial dyskinesias', Psychosomatics, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 263-269.
Kaufman, David Myland. / Facial dyskinesias. In: Psychosomatics. 1989 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 263-269.
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