Eye tracking dysfunction unrelated to clinical state and treatment with haloperidol

D. L. Levy, Richard B. Lipton, P. S. Holzman, J. M. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study provides longitudinal data showing that treatment with haloperidol produced no change in smooth pursuit eye movement compared to performance during unmedicated trials. Normal pursuit remained intact and abnormal pursuit remained deviant despite a significant reduction in the severity of psychotic symptoms. Three of four patients in both the standard and high dose groups showed normal pursuit throughout the first month of drug treatment. Thus it seems unlikely that impaired SPEM in medicated psychotic patients can be explained as an acute effect of antipsychotic drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)813-819
Number of pages7
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume18
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Haloperidol
Smooth Pursuit
Eye Movements
Antipsychotic Agents
Longitudinal Studies
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Eye tracking dysfunction unrelated to clinical state and treatment with haloperidol. / Levy, D. L.; Lipton, Richard B.; Holzman, P. S.; Davis, J. M.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 18, No. 7, 1983, p. 813-819.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levy, D. L. ; Lipton, Richard B. ; Holzman, P. S. ; Davis, J. M. / Eye tracking dysfunction unrelated to clinical state and treatment with haloperidol. In: Biological Psychiatry. 1983 ; Vol. 18, No. 7. pp. 813-819.
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