Exploring the Association of Asthma with Urinary Stone Disease

Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2014

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of urinary stone disease (USD) and asthma is rising and has recently been associated in a pediatric population. Objective: To investigate the association between asthma and USD in a nationally representative adult population. Design, setting, and participants: We analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2014, a US population-based cross-sectional study. A history of asthma and USD was obtained by self-report to questionnaires. USD severity was represented by graded stratification into non-stone formers, single stone formers, and recurrent stone formers (>2 stones). Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Odds ratios (ORs) for asthma were calculated for respondents with USD and separately for the graded USD groups. Survey-weighted logistic regression models included adjustments for demographics (model A), medical information (model B), and for relevant medications (model C). Results and limitations: A total of 20 906 participants aged ≥20 yr were included in the analysis. Of these, 9.2% reported of having a history of kidney stones. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for demographics, medical conditions, and medications showed that stone formers had significantly increased odds of asthma (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.47; p = 0.023). Separate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a graded association between single and recurrent stone formers and the odds of having asthma (p = 0.01), which remained significant in the 20–50-yr-old population and the diabetic population, especially for recurrent stone formers. Causal relationships were limited by cross-sectional nature of the study. Conclusions: Increasing severity of USD is associated with an increase in odds for asthma among American adults, providing impetus for future studies into the mechanisms explaining this phenomenon. Patient summary: In this report, we looked at self-reported histories of asthma and urinary stone disease (USD) using information from a large US population. We found that asthma was associated with USD; however, further studies are needed to elucidate this relationship. In this report, we analyzed self-reported histories of asthma and urinary stone disease (USD) using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data and found that increasing severity of USD is associated with asthma; however, further studies are needed to elucidate this relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEuropean Urology Focus
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Urinary Calculi
Nutrition Surveys
Asthma
Logistic Models
Population
Cross-Sectional Studies
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Demography
Kidney Calculi
Self Report
Confidence Intervals
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Kidney stone
  • Nephrolithiasis
  • Urinary calculi

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

@article{b2cdb0d1df77432d993a151cc479b436,
title = "Exploring the Association of Asthma with Urinary Stone Disease: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2014",
abstract = "Background: The prevalence of urinary stone disease (USD) and asthma is rising and has recently been associated in a pediatric population. Objective: To investigate the association between asthma and USD in a nationally representative adult population. Design, setting, and participants: We analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2014, a US population-based cross-sectional study. A history of asthma and USD was obtained by self-report to questionnaires. USD severity was represented by graded stratification into non-stone formers, single stone formers, and recurrent stone formers (>2 stones). Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Odds ratios (ORs) for asthma were calculated for respondents with USD and separately for the graded USD groups. Survey-weighted logistic regression models included adjustments for demographics (model A), medical information (model B), and for relevant medications (model C). Results and limitations: A total of 20 906 participants aged ≥20 yr were included in the analysis. Of these, 9.2{\%} reported of having a history of kidney stones. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for demographics, medical conditions, and medications showed that stone formers had significantly increased odds of asthma (odds ratio = 1.23; 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.03–1.47; p = 0.023). Separate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a graded association between single and recurrent stone formers and the odds of having asthma (p = 0.01), which remained significant in the 20–50-yr-old population and the diabetic population, especially for recurrent stone formers. Causal relationships were limited by cross-sectional nature of the study. Conclusions: Increasing severity of USD is associated with an increase in odds for asthma among American adults, providing impetus for future studies into the mechanisms explaining this phenomenon. Patient summary: In this report, we looked at self-reported histories of asthma and urinary stone disease (USD) using information from a large US population. We found that asthma was associated with USD; however, further studies are needed to elucidate this relationship. In this report, we analyzed self-reported histories of asthma and urinary stone disease (USD) using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data and found that increasing severity of USD is associated with asthma; however, further studies are needed to elucidate this relationship.",
keywords = "Asthma, Kidney stone, Nephrolithiasis, Urinary calculi",
author = "Lee, {Justin A.} and Abramowitz, {Matthew K.} and Naama Kipperman and Drzewiecki, {Beth A.} and Melamed, {Michal L.} and Stern, {Joshua M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.euf.2018.07.035",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "European Urology Focus",
issn = "2405-4569",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring the Association of Asthma with Urinary Stone Disease

T2 - Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2014

AU - Lee, Justin A.

AU - Abramowitz, Matthew K.

AU - Kipperman, Naama

AU - Drzewiecki, Beth A.

AU - Melamed, Michal L.

AU - Stern, Joshua M.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: The prevalence of urinary stone disease (USD) and asthma is rising and has recently been associated in a pediatric population. Objective: To investigate the association between asthma and USD in a nationally representative adult population. Design, setting, and participants: We analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2014, a US population-based cross-sectional study. A history of asthma and USD was obtained by self-report to questionnaires. USD severity was represented by graded stratification into non-stone formers, single stone formers, and recurrent stone formers (>2 stones). Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Odds ratios (ORs) for asthma were calculated for respondents with USD and separately for the graded USD groups. Survey-weighted logistic regression models included adjustments for demographics (model A), medical information (model B), and for relevant medications (model C). Results and limitations: A total of 20 906 participants aged ≥20 yr were included in the analysis. Of these, 9.2% reported of having a history of kidney stones. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for demographics, medical conditions, and medications showed that stone formers had significantly increased odds of asthma (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.47; p = 0.023). Separate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a graded association between single and recurrent stone formers and the odds of having asthma (p = 0.01), which remained significant in the 20–50-yr-old population and the diabetic population, especially for recurrent stone formers. Causal relationships were limited by cross-sectional nature of the study. Conclusions: Increasing severity of USD is associated with an increase in odds for asthma among American adults, providing impetus for future studies into the mechanisms explaining this phenomenon. Patient summary: In this report, we looked at self-reported histories of asthma and urinary stone disease (USD) using information from a large US population. We found that asthma was associated with USD; however, further studies are needed to elucidate this relationship. In this report, we analyzed self-reported histories of asthma and urinary stone disease (USD) using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data and found that increasing severity of USD is associated with asthma; however, further studies are needed to elucidate this relationship.

AB - Background: The prevalence of urinary stone disease (USD) and asthma is rising and has recently been associated in a pediatric population. Objective: To investigate the association between asthma and USD in a nationally representative adult population. Design, setting, and participants: We analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2014, a US population-based cross-sectional study. A history of asthma and USD was obtained by self-report to questionnaires. USD severity was represented by graded stratification into non-stone formers, single stone formers, and recurrent stone formers (>2 stones). Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Odds ratios (ORs) for asthma were calculated for respondents with USD and separately for the graded USD groups. Survey-weighted logistic regression models included adjustments for demographics (model A), medical information (model B), and for relevant medications (model C). Results and limitations: A total of 20 906 participants aged ≥20 yr were included in the analysis. Of these, 9.2% reported of having a history of kidney stones. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for demographics, medical conditions, and medications showed that stone formers had significantly increased odds of asthma (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.47; p = 0.023). Separate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a graded association between single and recurrent stone formers and the odds of having asthma (p = 0.01), which remained significant in the 20–50-yr-old population and the diabetic population, especially for recurrent stone formers. Causal relationships were limited by cross-sectional nature of the study. Conclusions: Increasing severity of USD is associated with an increase in odds for asthma among American adults, providing impetus for future studies into the mechanisms explaining this phenomenon. Patient summary: In this report, we looked at self-reported histories of asthma and urinary stone disease (USD) using information from a large US population. We found that asthma was associated with USD; however, further studies are needed to elucidate this relationship. In this report, we analyzed self-reported histories of asthma and urinary stone disease (USD) using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data and found that increasing severity of USD is associated with asthma; however, further studies are needed to elucidate this relationship.

KW - Asthma

KW - Kidney stone

KW - Nephrolithiasis

KW - Urinary calculi

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