Evidence for the cerebral uptake in vivo from two pools of glucose and the role of glucose-6-phosphatase in removing excess substrate from brain

William Sacks, David Cowburn, Rodney E. Bigler, Shirley Sacks, Arthur Fleischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We propose the following scheme for cerebral uptake and overall metabolism of glucose in vivo: that brain selects from two pools of glucose anomers in arterial blood, that it takes up excess glucose, that glucose enters the brain tissue as glucose-6-phosphate through the actions of mutarotase and hexokinase, that some glucose-6-phosphate becomes metabolized to CO2 and some becomes incorporated into brain carbon pools, and that excess glucose-6-phosphate leaves brain through glucose-6-phosphatase and mutarotase activities. This results from our observations in arterio-venous studies for the determination of cerebral metabolism in humans in vivo that the cerebral uptake of [14C]glucose often appeared to differ from that of unlabeled glucose. With rapidly falling arterial radioactivity, unlabeled glucose uptake was more than [14C]glucose. With rising arterial radioactivity, [14C]glucose extraction extraction exceeded unlabeled glucose. Studies with [14C]glucose-6-phosphate suggested that glucose-6-phosphatase in brain removes excess substrate by dephosphorylation. However, when arterial [14C]glucose increased slowly, [14C]glucose uptake varied considerably and the data resembled human cerebral metabolism of glucose anomers. An experiment employing [13C]glucose and NMR provided further support for our proposed scheme.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-227
Number of pages27
JournalNeurochemical Research
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Glucose-6-Phosphatase
Brain
Glucose
Substrates
Glucose-6-Phosphate
Metabolism
Radioactivity
Accidental Falls
Hexokinase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Evidence for the cerebral uptake in vivo from two pools of glucose and the role of glucose-6-phosphatase in removing excess substrate from brain. / Sacks, William; Cowburn, David; Bigler, Rodney E.; Sacks, Shirley; Fleischer, Arthur.

In: Neurochemical Research, Vol. 10, No. 2, 02.1985, p. 201-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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