Epidemiology of lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American college of chest physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines

Anthony J. Alberg, Malcolm V. Brock, Jean G. Ford, Jonathan M. Samet, Simon D. Spivack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

265 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChest
Volume143
Issue number5 SUPPL
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

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Evidence-Based Practice
Practice Guidelines
Lung Neoplasms
Epidemiology
Thorax
Physicians
Smoking
Tobacco
Biomarkers
Indoor Air Pollution
Lung
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Research
Tobacco Products
Carcinogens
Developing Countries
Lung Diseases
Cause of Death
Carcinogenesis
HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Epidemiology of lung cancer : Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American college of chest physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. / Alberg, Anthony J.; Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

In: Chest, Vol. 143, No. 5 SUPPL, 05.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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