Epidemiology of gait disorders in community-residing older adults

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To study the epidemiology of gait disorders in community-residing older adults and their association with death and institutionalization. DESIGN: Community-based cohort study. SETTING: Bronx County and the research center at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. PARTICIPANTS: The Einstein Aging study recruited 488 adults aged 70 to 99 between 1999 and 2001. At entry and during annual visits over 5 years, subjects received clinical evaluations to determine presence of neurological or nonneurological gait abnormalities. MEASUREMENTS: Prevalence and incidence of gait disorders based on clinical evaluations and time to institutionalization and death. RESULTS: Of 468 subjects (95.9%) with baseline gait evaluations, 168 had abnormal gaits: 70 neurological, 81 nonneurological, and 17 both. Prevalence of abnormal gait was 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI)=28.6-42.1). Incidence of abnormal gait was 168.6 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI=117.4-242.0) and increased with age. Men had a higher incidence of neurological gait abnormalities, whereas women had a higher incidence of nonneurological gaits. Abnormal gaits were associated with greater risk of institutionalization and death (hazard ratio (HR)=2.2, 95% CI=1.5-3.2). The risk was strongly related to severity of impairment; subjects with moderate to severe gait abnormalities (HR=3.2, 95% CI=1.9-5.2) were at higher risk than those with mild gait abnormalities (HR=1.8, 95% CI=1.0-2.8). CONCLUSION: The incidence and prevalence of gait disorders are high in community-residing older adults and are associated with greater risk of institutionalization and death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-261
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006

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Gait
Epidemiology
Institutionalization
Confidence Intervals
Incidence
Cohort Studies
Medicine

Keywords

  • Death
  • Gait
  • Incidence
  • Institutionalization
  • Prevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

@article{a5c61f6bca894fb59b6b5caea48219d6,
title = "Epidemiology of gait disorders in community-residing older adults",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To study the epidemiology of gait disorders in community-residing older adults and their association with death and institutionalization. DESIGN: Community-based cohort study. SETTING: Bronx County and the research center at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. PARTICIPANTS: The Einstein Aging study recruited 488 adults aged 70 to 99 between 1999 and 2001. At entry and during annual visits over 5 years, subjects received clinical evaluations to determine presence of neurological or nonneurological gait abnormalities. MEASUREMENTS: Prevalence and incidence of gait disorders based on clinical evaluations and time to institutionalization and death. RESULTS: Of 468 subjects (95.9{\%}) with baseline gait evaluations, 168 had abnormal gaits: 70 neurological, 81 nonneurological, and 17 both. Prevalence of abnormal gait was 35.0{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval (CI)=28.6-42.1). Incidence of abnormal gait was 168.6 per 1,000 person-years (95{\%} CI=117.4-242.0) and increased with age. Men had a higher incidence of neurological gait abnormalities, whereas women had a higher incidence of nonneurological gaits. Abnormal gaits were associated with greater risk of institutionalization and death (hazard ratio (HR)=2.2, 95{\%} CI=1.5-3.2). The risk was strongly related to severity of impairment; subjects with moderate to severe gait abnormalities (HR=3.2, 95{\%} CI=1.9-5.2) were at higher risk than those with mild gait abnormalities (HR=1.8, 95{\%} CI=1.0-2.8). CONCLUSION: The incidence and prevalence of gait disorders are high in community-residing older adults and are associated with greater risk of institutionalization and death.",
keywords = "Death, Gait, Incidence, Institutionalization, Prevalence",
author = "Joe Verghese and Aaron LeValley and Hall, {Charles B.} and Katz, {Mindy J.} and Ambrose, {Anne F.} and Lipton, {Richard B.}",
year = "2006",
month = "2",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Epidemiology of gait disorders in community-residing older adults

AU - Verghese, Joe

AU - LeValley, Aaron

AU - Hall, Charles B.

AU - Katz, Mindy J.

AU - Ambrose, Anne F.

AU - Lipton, Richard B.

PY - 2006/2

Y1 - 2006/2

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To study the epidemiology of gait disorders in community-residing older adults and their association with death and institutionalization. DESIGN: Community-based cohort study. SETTING: Bronx County and the research center at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. PARTICIPANTS: The Einstein Aging study recruited 488 adults aged 70 to 99 between 1999 and 2001. At entry and during annual visits over 5 years, subjects received clinical evaluations to determine presence of neurological or nonneurological gait abnormalities. MEASUREMENTS: Prevalence and incidence of gait disorders based on clinical evaluations and time to institutionalization and death. RESULTS: Of 468 subjects (95.9%) with baseline gait evaluations, 168 had abnormal gaits: 70 neurological, 81 nonneurological, and 17 both. Prevalence of abnormal gait was 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI)=28.6-42.1). Incidence of abnormal gait was 168.6 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI=117.4-242.0) and increased with age. Men had a higher incidence of neurological gait abnormalities, whereas women had a higher incidence of nonneurological gaits. Abnormal gaits were associated with greater risk of institutionalization and death (hazard ratio (HR)=2.2, 95% CI=1.5-3.2). The risk was strongly related to severity of impairment; subjects with moderate to severe gait abnormalities (HR=3.2, 95% CI=1.9-5.2) were at higher risk than those with mild gait abnormalities (HR=1.8, 95% CI=1.0-2.8). CONCLUSION: The incidence and prevalence of gait disorders are high in community-residing older adults and are associated with greater risk of institutionalization and death.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To study the epidemiology of gait disorders in community-residing older adults and their association with death and institutionalization. DESIGN: Community-based cohort study. SETTING: Bronx County and the research center at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. PARTICIPANTS: The Einstein Aging study recruited 488 adults aged 70 to 99 between 1999 and 2001. At entry and during annual visits over 5 years, subjects received clinical evaluations to determine presence of neurological or nonneurological gait abnormalities. MEASUREMENTS: Prevalence and incidence of gait disorders based on clinical evaluations and time to institutionalization and death. RESULTS: Of 468 subjects (95.9%) with baseline gait evaluations, 168 had abnormal gaits: 70 neurological, 81 nonneurological, and 17 both. Prevalence of abnormal gait was 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI)=28.6-42.1). Incidence of abnormal gait was 168.6 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI=117.4-242.0) and increased with age. Men had a higher incidence of neurological gait abnormalities, whereas women had a higher incidence of nonneurological gaits. Abnormal gaits were associated with greater risk of institutionalization and death (hazard ratio (HR)=2.2, 95% CI=1.5-3.2). The risk was strongly related to severity of impairment; subjects with moderate to severe gait abnormalities (HR=3.2, 95% CI=1.9-5.2) were at higher risk than those with mild gait abnormalities (HR=1.8, 95% CI=1.0-2.8). CONCLUSION: The incidence and prevalence of gait disorders are high in community-residing older adults and are associated with greater risk of institutionalization and death.

KW - Death

KW - Gait

KW - Incidence

KW - Institutionalization

KW - Prevalence

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DO - 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2005.00580.x

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JO - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

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