Epidemiology of Brain Tumors

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brain tumors are the commonest solid tumor in children, leading to significant cancer-related mortality. Several hereditary syndromes associated with brain tumors are nonfamilial. Ionizing radiation is a well-recognized risk factor for brain tumors. Several industrial exposures have been evaluated for a causal association with brain tumor formation but the results are inconclusive. A casual association between the common mutagens of tobacco, alcohol, or dietary factors has not yet been established. There is no clear evidence that the incidence of brain tumors has changed over time. This article presents the descriptive epidemiology of the commonest brain tumors of children and adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)981-998
Number of pages18
JournalNeurologic Clinics
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Brain Neoplasms
Epidemiology
Mutagens
Ionizing Radiation
Tobacco
Neoplasms
Alcohols
Mortality
Incidence

Keywords

  • Glioma
  • Ionizing radiation
  • Medulloblastoma
  • Meningioma
  • Neurofibromatosis
  • Pituitary adenoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Epidemiology of Brain Tumors. / McNeill, Katharine A.

In: Neurologic Clinics, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.11.2016, p. 981-998.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

McNeill, Katharine A. / Epidemiology of Brain Tumors. In: Neurologic Clinics. 2016 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 981-998.
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