Enzymatic transition states, transition-state analogs, dynamics, thermodynamics, and lifetimes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Experimental analysis of enzymatic transition-state structures uses kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) to report on bonding and geometry differences between reactants and the transition state. Computational correlation of experimental values with chemical models permits three-dimensional geometric and electrostatic assignment of transition states formed at enzymatic catalytic sites. The combination of experimental and computational access to transition-state information permits (a) the design of transition-state analogs as powerful enzymatic inhibitors, (b) exploration of protein features linked to transition-state structure, (c) analysis of ensemble atomic motions involved in achieving the transition state, (d) transition-state lifetimes, and (e) separation of ground-state (Michaelis complexes) from transition-state effects. Transition-state analogs with picomolar dissociation constants have been achieved for several enzymatic targets. Transition states of closely related isozymes indicate that the protein's dynamic architecture is linked to transition-state structure. Fast dynamic motions in catalytic sites are linked to transition-state generation. Enzymatic transition states have lifetimes of femtoseconds, the lifetime of bond vibrations. Binding isotope effects (BIEs) reveal relative reactant and transition-state analog binding distortion for comparison with actual transition states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)703-732
Number of pages30
JournalAnnual Review of Biochemistry
Volume80
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 7 2011

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Thermodynamics
Isotopes
Catalytic Domain
Chemical Models
Electron transitions
Vibration
Static Electricity
Ground state
Isoenzymes
Electrostatics
Proteins
Kinetics
Geometry

Keywords

  • drug design
  • inhibitor design
  • isotope effects
  • protein conformations
  • protein dynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Enzymatic transition states, transition-state analogs, dynamics, thermodynamics, and lifetimes. / Schramm, Vern L.

In: Annual Review of Biochemistry, Vol. 80, 07.07.2011, p. 703-732.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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