Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria

Brandi D. Freeman, Yuri C. Martins, Oscar B. Akide-Ndunge, Fernando P. Bruno, Hua Wang, Herbert B. Tanowitz, David C. Spray, Mahalia S. Desruisseaux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plasmodium falciparum infection causes a wide spectrum of diseases, including cerebral malaria, a potentially life-threatening encephalopathy. Vasculopathy is thought to contribute to cerebral malaria pathogenesis. The vasoactive compound endothelin-1, a key participant in many inflammatory processes, likely mediates vascular and cognitive dysfunctions in cerebral malaria. We previously demonstrated that C57BL6 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA, our fatal experimental cerebral malaria model, sustained memory loss. Herein, we demonstrate that an endothelin type A receptor (ETA) antagonist prevented experimental cerebral malaria-induced neurocognitive impairments and improved survival. ETA antagonism prevented blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral vasoconstriction during experimental cerebral malaria, and reduced brain endothelial activation, diminishing brain microvascular congestion. Furthermore, exogenous endothelin-1 administration to P. berghei NK65-infected mice, a model generally regarded as a non-cerebral malaria negative control for P. berghei ANKA infection, led to experimental cerebral malaria-like memory deficits. Our data indicate that endothelin-1 is critical in the development of cerebrovascular and cognitive impairments with experimental cerebral malaria. This vasoactive peptide may thus serve as a potential target for adjunctive therapy in the management of cerebral malaria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1005477
JournalPLoS Pathogens
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Cerebral Malaria
Endothelin-1
Theoretical Models
Brain
Memory Disorders
Malaria
Cognitive Dysfunction
Endothelin A Receptors
Brain Diseases
Plasmodium falciparum
Vasoconstriction
Blood-Brain Barrier
Blood Vessels
Peptides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Immunology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Freeman, B. D., Martins, Y. C., Akide-Ndunge, O. B., Bruno, F. P., Wang, H., Tanowitz, H. B., ... Desruisseaux, M. S. (2016). Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria. PLoS Pathogens, 12(3), [e1005477]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1005477

Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria. / Freeman, Brandi D.; Martins, Yuri C.; Akide-Ndunge, Oscar B.; Bruno, Fernando P.; Wang, Hua; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Spray, David C.; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S.

In: PLoS Pathogens, Vol. 12, No. 3, e1005477, 01.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Freeman, Brandi D. ; Martins, Yuri C. ; Akide-Ndunge, Oscar B. ; Bruno, Fernando P. ; Wang, Hua ; Tanowitz, Herbert B. ; Spray, David C. ; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S. / Endothelin-1 Mediates Brain Microvascular Dysfunction Leading to Long-Term Cognitive Impairment in a Model of Experimental Cerebral Malaria. In: PLoS Pathogens. 2016 ; Vol. 12, No. 3.
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