Employment status and the association of sociocultural stress with sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

Carmela Alcántara, Linda C. Gallo, Jia Wen, Katherine A. Dudley, Douglas M. Wallace, Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Phyllis C. Zee, Alberto R. Ramos, Megan E. Petrov, Melynda D. Casement, Martica H. Hall, Susan Redline, Sanjay R. Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives We examined the association of sociocultural stress severity (i.e. acculturation stress, ethnic discrimination) and chronic stress burden with multiple dimensions of sleep in a population-based sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. We also explored whether employment status modified stress-sleep associations. Methods We conducted survey linear regressions to test the cross-sectional association of sociocultural stress severity and stress burden with sleep dimensions using data collected between 2010 and 2013 from individuals who participated in both the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Suenõ and Sociocultural Ancillary studies (N = 1192). Results Greater acculturation stress (B = 0.75, standard error [SE] = 0.26, p <.01) and chronic psychosocial stress burden (B = 1.04, SE = 0.18, p <.001) were associated with greater insomnia symptoms but were not associated with actigraphic measures of sleep. Ethnic discrimination was not associated with any of the sleep dimensions. The association of acculturation stress with insomnia severity was greater in unemployed (B = 2.06, SE = 0.34) compared to employed (B = 1.01, SE = 0.31) participants (p-interaction =.08). Conclusions Acculturation stress severity and chronic stress burden are important and consistent correlates of insomnia, but not actigraphically measured sleep dimensions. If replicated, future research should test whether interventions targeting the resolution of sociocultural stress improve sleep quality in Hispanics/Latinos.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSleep
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 12 2019

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Sleep
Acculturation
Health
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Linear Models
Population

Keywords

  • actigraphy
  • employment status
  • Hispanic
  • insomnia
  • psychosocial factors
  • sleep
  • social determinants
  • sociocultural
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Employment status and the association of sociocultural stress with sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). / Alcántara, Carmela; Gallo, Linda C.; Wen, Jia; Dudley, Katherine A.; Wallace, Douglas M.; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Zee, Phyllis C.; Ramos, Alberto R.; Petrov, Megan E.; Casement, Melynda D.; Hall, Martica H.; Redline, Susan; Patel, Sanjay R.

In: Sleep, Vol. 42, No. 4, 12.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alcántara, C, Gallo, LC, Wen, J, Dudley, KA, Wallace, DM, Mossavar-Rahmani, Y, Sotres-Alvarez, D, Zee, PC, Ramos, AR, Petrov, ME, Casement, MD, Hall, MH, Redline, S & Patel, SR 2019, 'Employment status and the association of sociocultural stress with sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)', Sleep, vol. 42, no. 4. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz002
Alcántara, Carmela ; Gallo, Linda C. ; Wen, Jia ; Dudley, Katherine A. ; Wallace, Douglas M. ; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin ; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela ; Zee, Phyllis C. ; Ramos, Alberto R. ; Petrov, Megan E. ; Casement, Melynda D. ; Hall, Martica H. ; Redline, Susan ; Patel, Sanjay R. / Employment status and the association of sociocultural stress with sleep in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). In: Sleep. 2019 ; Vol. 42, No. 4.
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abstract = "Study Objectives We examined the association of sociocultural stress severity (i.e. acculturation stress, ethnic discrimination) and chronic stress burden with multiple dimensions of sleep in a population-based sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. We also explored whether employment status modified stress-sleep associations. Methods We conducted survey linear regressions to test the cross-sectional association of sociocultural stress severity and stress burden with sleep dimensions using data collected between 2010 and 2013 from individuals who participated in both the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Suen{\~o} and Sociocultural Ancillary studies (N = 1192). Results Greater acculturation stress (B = 0.75, standard error [SE] = 0.26, p <.01) and chronic psychosocial stress burden (B = 1.04, SE = 0.18, p <.001) were associated with greater insomnia symptoms but were not associated with actigraphic measures of sleep. Ethnic discrimination was not associated with any of the sleep dimensions. The association of acculturation stress with insomnia severity was greater in unemployed (B = 2.06, SE = 0.34) compared to employed (B = 1.01, SE = 0.31) participants (p-interaction =.08). Conclusions Acculturation stress severity and chronic stress burden are important and consistent correlates of insomnia, but not actigraphically measured sleep dimensions. If replicated, future research should test whether interventions targeting the resolution of sociocultural stress improve sleep quality in Hispanics/Latinos.",
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AU - Alcántara, Carmela

AU - Gallo, Linda C.

AU - Wen, Jia

AU - Dudley, Katherine A.

AU - Wallace, Douglas M.

AU - Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin

AU - Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela

AU - Zee, Phyllis C.

AU - Ramos, Alberto R.

AU - Petrov, Megan E.

AU - Casement, Melynda D.

AU - Hall, Martica H.

AU - Redline, Susan

AU - Patel, Sanjay R.

PY - 2019/2/12

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N2 - Study Objectives We examined the association of sociocultural stress severity (i.e. acculturation stress, ethnic discrimination) and chronic stress burden with multiple dimensions of sleep in a population-based sample of US Hispanics/Latinos. We also explored whether employment status modified stress-sleep associations. Methods We conducted survey linear regressions to test the cross-sectional association of sociocultural stress severity and stress burden with sleep dimensions using data collected between 2010 and 2013 from individuals who participated in both the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Suenõ and Sociocultural Ancillary studies (N = 1192). Results Greater acculturation stress (B = 0.75, standard error [SE] = 0.26, p <.01) and chronic psychosocial stress burden (B = 1.04, SE = 0.18, p <.001) were associated with greater insomnia symptoms but were not associated with actigraphic measures of sleep. Ethnic discrimination was not associated with any of the sleep dimensions. The association of acculturation stress with insomnia severity was greater in unemployed (B = 2.06, SE = 0.34) compared to employed (B = 1.01, SE = 0.31) participants (p-interaction =.08). Conclusions Acculturation stress severity and chronic stress burden are important and consistent correlates of insomnia, but not actigraphically measured sleep dimensions. If replicated, future research should test whether interventions targeting the resolution of sociocultural stress improve sleep quality in Hispanics/Latinos.

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KW - social determinants

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