Emergency contraception

A national survey of adolescent health experts

Melanie A. Gold, Aviva Schein, Susan M. Coupey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a survey of 167 physicians with expertise in adolescent health, 84% said they prescribe contraception to adolescents, but only 80% of these prescribe emergency contraception, generally a few times a year at most. Some 12% of respondents said they believe that providing emergency contraception to adolescents would encourage contraceptive risk-taking, 25% said they think it would discourage correct use of other methods and 29% said they think repeated use of the method could pose health risks. Physicians who were more likely than their colleagues to prescribe emergency contraception included obstetrician-gynecologists (92%), those who graduated from medical school after 1970 (77%) and those who describe their practice as being in an 'academic' setting (76%). Physicians may restrict use of the method by limiting treatment to adolescents who seek it within 48 hours after unprotected intercourse (29%), by requiring a pregnancy test (64%) or an office visit (68%), or by using the timing of menses as a criterion for providing the method (46%). While 41% of physicians who provide emergency contraception counsel adolescents about the method during family planning visits, only 28% do so during visits for routine health care; 16% counsel women who are not yet sexually active about the method.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFamily Planning Perspectives
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1997

Fingerprint

Postcoital Contraception
contraception
expert
adolescent
health
physician
Physicians
Pregnancy Tests
Office Visits
Menstruation
Family Planning Services
Contraceptive Agents
Risk-Taking
health risk
Medical Schools
Contraception
contraceptive
family planning
Adolescent Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Emergency contraception : A national survey of adolescent health experts. / Gold, Melanie A.; Schein, Aviva; Coupey, Susan M.

In: Family Planning Perspectives, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3b2a586dc61f4f98a27805859850d9fa,
title = "Emergency contraception: A national survey of adolescent health experts",
abstract = "In a survey of 167 physicians with expertise in adolescent health, 84{\%} said they prescribe contraception to adolescents, but only 80{\%} of these prescribe emergency contraception, generally a few times a year at most. Some 12{\%} of respondents said they believe that providing emergency contraception to adolescents would encourage contraceptive risk-taking, 25{\%} said they think it would discourage correct use of other methods and 29{\%} said they think repeated use of the method could pose health risks. Physicians who were more likely than their colleagues to prescribe emergency contraception included obstetrician-gynecologists (92{\%}), those who graduated from medical school after 1970 (77{\%}) and those who describe their practice as being in an 'academic' setting (76{\%}). Physicians may restrict use of the method by limiting treatment to adolescents who seek it within 48 hours after unprotected intercourse (29{\%}), by requiring a pregnancy test (64{\%}) or an office visit (68{\%}), or by using the timing of menses as a criterion for providing the method (46{\%}). While 41{\%} of physicians who provide emergency contraception counsel adolescents about the method during family planning visits, only 28{\%} do so during visits for routine health care; 16{\%} counsel women who are not yet sexually active about the method.",
author = "Gold, {Melanie A.} and Aviva Schein and Coupey, {Susan M.}",
year = "1997",
month = "1",
doi = "10.2307/2953348",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
journal = "Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health",
issn = "1538-6341",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emergency contraception

T2 - A national survey of adolescent health experts

AU - Gold, Melanie A.

AU - Schein, Aviva

AU - Coupey, Susan M.

PY - 1997/1

Y1 - 1997/1

N2 - In a survey of 167 physicians with expertise in adolescent health, 84% said they prescribe contraception to adolescents, but only 80% of these prescribe emergency contraception, generally a few times a year at most. Some 12% of respondents said they believe that providing emergency contraception to adolescents would encourage contraceptive risk-taking, 25% said they think it would discourage correct use of other methods and 29% said they think repeated use of the method could pose health risks. Physicians who were more likely than their colleagues to prescribe emergency contraception included obstetrician-gynecologists (92%), those who graduated from medical school after 1970 (77%) and those who describe their practice as being in an 'academic' setting (76%). Physicians may restrict use of the method by limiting treatment to adolescents who seek it within 48 hours after unprotected intercourse (29%), by requiring a pregnancy test (64%) or an office visit (68%), or by using the timing of menses as a criterion for providing the method (46%). While 41% of physicians who provide emergency contraception counsel adolescents about the method during family planning visits, only 28% do so during visits for routine health care; 16% counsel women who are not yet sexually active about the method.

AB - In a survey of 167 physicians with expertise in adolescent health, 84% said they prescribe contraception to adolescents, but only 80% of these prescribe emergency contraception, generally a few times a year at most. Some 12% of respondents said they believe that providing emergency contraception to adolescents would encourage contraceptive risk-taking, 25% said they think it would discourage correct use of other methods and 29% said they think repeated use of the method could pose health risks. Physicians who were more likely than their colleagues to prescribe emergency contraception included obstetrician-gynecologists (92%), those who graduated from medical school after 1970 (77%) and those who describe their practice as being in an 'academic' setting (76%). Physicians may restrict use of the method by limiting treatment to adolescents who seek it within 48 hours after unprotected intercourse (29%), by requiring a pregnancy test (64%) or an office visit (68%), or by using the timing of menses as a criterion for providing the method (46%). While 41% of physicians who provide emergency contraception counsel adolescents about the method during family planning visits, only 28% do so during visits for routine health care; 16% counsel women who are not yet sexually active about the method.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=19244373943&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=19244373943&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2307/2953348

DO - 10.2307/2953348

M3 - Article

VL - 29

JO - Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

JF - Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

SN - 1538-6341

IS - 1

ER -