Elevated levels of umbilical cord plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone in growth-retarded fetuses

Robin S. Goland, Sheila Jozak, Wendy B. Warren, Irene M. Conwell, Raymond I. Stark, Pamela J. Tropper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

287 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CRH is synthesized in the hypothalamus and released in response to stress into the portal hypophyseal blood; an additional site of synthesis, the placenta, is present only during pregnancy. Placental CRH is released into the maternal and fetal circulation during human pregnancy, and we hypothesized that the chronic fetal stress associated with fetal growth retardation may stimulate placental CRH release. We measured plasma CRH concentrations in the umbilical cord blood of 28 growth-retarded fetuses and 28 normally grown fetuses matched for gestational age and mode of delivery. Plasma ACTH, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and cortisol were also measured in the umbilical cord samples to determine if CRH levels were correlated with levels of pituitary and adrenal hormones. The mean umbilical cord plasma CRH level in the growth-retarded fetuses was 206 ± 25.8 pmol/L, which was significantly higher than that in the normally grown fetuses matched for gestational age, presence or absence of labor, and mode of delivery (49.4 ± 16.7 pmol/L; P < 0.01). The mean plasma ACTH level in the growth-retarded fetuses (5.7 ± 1.2 pmol/L) was significantly higher than that in the normally grown fetuses (3.3 ± 0.7 pmol/L; P < 0.05). The mean cortisol concentration in the growth-retarded fetuses was 260 ± 32.5 nmol/L, and that in the normally grown fetuses was 220 ± 40 nmol/L. The mean DHEAS level was significantly lower in the growth-retarded fetuses (4.8 ± 0.6 μmol/L) than that in the normally grown fetuses (7.7 ± 0.6 μmol/L; P < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between umbilical cord plasma CRH and both ACTH and cortisol concentrations as well as a significant negative correlation between CRH and DHEAS levels in the growth-retarded fetuses. The umbilical cord plasma CRH level is extremely elevated in growth-retarded fetuses compared to that in normal fetuses. Placental CRH, like hypothalamic CRH, may be stimulated in conditions of chronic stress and may modulate fetal pituitary-adrenal function in high risk pregnancies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1174-1179
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume77
Issue number5
StatePublished - Nov 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Umbilical Cord
Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone
Fetus
Plasmas
Growth
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
Hydrocortisone
Blood
Gestational Age
High-Risk Pregnancy
Pregnancy
Pituitary Hormones
Fetal Growth Retardation
Personnel
Hormones
Fetal Blood
Placenta
Hypothalamus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Goland, R. S., Jozak, S., Warren, W. B., Conwell, I. M., Stark, R. I., & Tropper, P. J. (1993). Elevated levels of umbilical cord plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone in growth-retarded fetuses. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 77(5), 1174-1179.

Elevated levels of umbilical cord plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone in growth-retarded fetuses. / Goland, Robin S.; Jozak, Sheila; Warren, Wendy B.; Conwell, Irene M.; Stark, Raymond I.; Tropper, Pamela J.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 77, No. 5, 11.1993, p. 1174-1179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goland, RS, Jozak, S, Warren, WB, Conwell, IM, Stark, RI & Tropper, PJ 1993, 'Elevated levels of umbilical cord plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone in growth-retarded fetuses', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 77, no. 5, pp. 1174-1179.
Goland, Robin S. ; Jozak, Sheila ; Warren, Wendy B. ; Conwell, Irene M. ; Stark, Raymond I. ; Tropper, Pamela J. / Elevated levels of umbilical cord plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone in growth-retarded fetuses. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1993 ; Vol. 77, No. 5. pp. 1174-1179.
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