Electronic monitoring improves brace-wearing compliance in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

A randomized clinical trial

Daniel J. Miller, Jeanne M. Franzone, Hiroko Matsumoto, Jaime A. Gomez, Javier Avendaño, Joshua E. Hyman, David P. Roye, Michael G. Vitale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Design. Randomized controlled trial. Objective. To assess whether monitoring increases brace-wearing compliance in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Summary of Background Data. Noncompliance is a barrier to brace treatment of AIS. Studies have demonstrated that monitoring improves medication compliance; however, this has not been investigated in spinal braces. Methods. Twenty-one patients (mean age = 12.4 ± 2.0 years) with AIS were prescribed treatment with a custom-made Thoraco-Lumbo-Sacral- Orthosis for 18 hours a day using a standardized script. Before beginning treatment, 10 patients were randomized to be informed that their compliance was monitored, whereas 11 patients were unaware. Compliance was measured via a temperature probe embedded within the Thoraco-Lumbo-Sacral-Orthosis hidden from view. Results. Patients who were notified that they had a monitor in their brace demonstrated significantly increased compliance during the first 14 weeks of treatment compared with those who were uninformed (85.7% vs. 56.5%, P = 0.029), corresponding to a mean difference of 5.24 hours of daily brace wear. Conclusion. Electronic monitoring can improve compliance with orthoses in patients with spinal deformity during a short observation period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-721
Number of pages5
JournalSpine
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Braces
Scoliosis
Patient Compliance
Randomized Controlled Trials
Orthotic Devices
Compliance
Medication Adherence
Therapeutics
Observation
Temperature

Keywords

  • adolescent idiopathic scoliosis
  • compliance
  • Spinal bracing
  • temperature monitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Electronic monitoring improves brace-wearing compliance in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis : A randomized clinical trial. / Miller, Daniel J.; Franzone, Jeanne M.; Matsumoto, Hiroko; Gomez, Jaime A.; Avendaño, Javier; Hyman, Joshua E.; Roye, David P.; Vitale, Michael G.

In: Spine, Vol. 37, No. 9, 20.04.2012, p. 717-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Daniel J. ; Franzone, Jeanne M. ; Matsumoto, Hiroko ; Gomez, Jaime A. ; Avendaño, Javier ; Hyman, Joshua E. ; Roye, David P. ; Vitale, Michael G. / Electronic monitoring improves brace-wearing compliance in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis : A randomized clinical trial. In: Spine. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 9. pp. 717-721.
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