Efforts to produce human cytotoxic T-cell hybridomas by electrofusion and PEG fusion

Claudia Gravekamp, D. Santoli, R. Vreugdenhil, J. G. Collard, R. L. Bolhuis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cytotoxic human T cells from different sources were fused with different types of human T-lymphoma cells and mouse B-myeloma cells using variations of the polyethylene glycol (PEG) method and electrofusion. Both techniques yielded proliferating hybridomas. The frequency of wells with proliferating hybridomas depended on the tumor fusion partner used; the best results were obtained with HSB-1, whereas fusions with JURKAT-1 and HPB-1 did not yield any hybridomas. For one tumor cell line (HSB-1), considerably more hybridomas were obtained with electrofusion than with the PEG fusion (with or without heat shock). There was no consistent relationship between the presence or absence of cytotoxic activity of the T lymphocytes against the tumor fusion partner and the yield of hybridomas. In human-human as well as in human-mouse hybridomas most of the lymphocyte derived chromosomes were lost. Four of the more than 600 hybridomas tested showed transient cytotoxic activity, but in none of them this function could be immortalized. Two of the hybridomas obtained with CEM-1 as tumor fusion partner expressed low levels of lymphocyte-derived CD3 antigens. Two hybridomas obtained with HSB-1 were highly invasive in vitro in rat hepatocyte cultures, whereas HSB-1 tumor cells were not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-133
Number of pages13
JournalHybridoma
Volume6
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Hybridomas
T-Lymphocytes
Neoplasms
Lymphocytes
CD3 Antigens
T-Cell Lymphoma
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
Tumor Cell Line
Hepatocytes
Shock
Hot Temperature
Chromosomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Gravekamp, C., Santoli, D., Vreugdenhil, R., Collard, J. G., & Bolhuis, R. L. (1987). Efforts to produce human cytotoxic T-cell hybridomas by electrofusion and PEG fusion. Hybridoma, 6(2), 121-133.

Efforts to produce human cytotoxic T-cell hybridomas by electrofusion and PEG fusion. / Gravekamp, Claudia; Santoli, D.; Vreugdenhil, R.; Collard, J. G.; Bolhuis, R. L.

In: Hybridoma, Vol. 6, No. 2, 1987, p. 121-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gravekamp, C, Santoli, D, Vreugdenhil, R, Collard, JG & Bolhuis, RL 1987, 'Efforts to produce human cytotoxic T-cell hybridomas by electrofusion and PEG fusion', Hybridoma, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 121-133.
Gravekamp C, Santoli D, Vreugdenhil R, Collard JG, Bolhuis RL. Efforts to produce human cytotoxic T-cell hybridomas by electrofusion and PEG fusion. Hybridoma. 1987;6(2):121-133.
Gravekamp, Claudia ; Santoli, D. ; Vreugdenhil, R. ; Collard, J. G. ; Bolhuis, R. L. / Efforts to produce human cytotoxic T-cell hybridomas by electrofusion and PEG fusion. In: Hybridoma. 1987 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 121-133.
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