Effects of habitual coffee consumption on cardiometabolic disease, cardiovascular health, and all-cause mortality

James H. O'Keefe, Salman K. Bhatti, Harshal R. Patil, James J. Dinicolantonio, Sean C. Lucan, Carl J. Lavie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coffee, after water, is the most widely consumed beverage in the United States, and is the principal source of caffeine intake among adults. The biological effects of coffee may be substantial and are not limited to the actions of caffeine. Coffee is a complex beverage containing hundreds of biologically active compounds, and the health effects of chronic coffee intake are wide ranging. From a cardiovascular (CV) standpoint, coffee consumption may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, as well as other conditions associated with CV risk such as obesity and depression; but it may adversely affect lipid profiles depending on how the beverage is prepared. Regardless, a growing body of data suggests that habitual coffee consumption is neutral to beneficial regarding the risks of a variety of adverse CV outcomes including coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. Moreover, large epidemiological studies suggest that regular coffee drinkers have reduced risks of mortality, both CV and all-cause. The potential benefits also include protection against neurodegenerative diseases, improved asthma control, and lower risk of select gastrointestinal diseases. A daily intake of ∼2 to 3 cups of coffee appears to be safe and is associated with neutral to beneficial effects for most of the studied health outcomes. However, most of the data on coffee's health effects are based on observational data, with very few randomized, controlled studies, and association does not prove causation. Additionally, the possible advantages of regular coffee consumption have to be weighed against potential risks (which are mostly related to its high caffeine content) including anxiety, insomnia, tremulousness, and palpitations, as well as bone loss and possibly increased risk of fractures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1043-1051
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume62
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 17 2013

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Coffee
Cardiovascular Diseases
Mortality
Health
Beverages
Caffeine
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Causality
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Coronary Disease
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Epidemiologic Studies
Asthma
Anxiety
Heart Failure
Obesity
Stroke
Depression

Keywords

  • caffeine
  • cardiometabolic disease
  • coffee
  • coronary heart disease
  • hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effects of habitual coffee consumption on cardiometabolic disease, cardiovascular health, and all-cause mortality. / O'Keefe, James H.; Bhatti, Salman K.; Patil, Harshal R.; Dinicolantonio, James J.; Lucan, Sean C.; Lavie, Carl J.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 62, No. 12, 17.09.2013, p. 1043-1051.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Keefe, James H. ; Bhatti, Salman K. ; Patil, Harshal R. ; Dinicolantonio, James J. ; Lucan, Sean C. ; Lavie, Carl J. / Effects of habitual coffee consumption on cardiometabolic disease, cardiovascular health, and all-cause mortality. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2013 ; Vol. 62, No. 12. pp. 1043-1051.
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