Effects of diode laser welding with dye-enhanced glue on tensile strength of sutures commonly used in urology

Andrew J. Kirsch, David T. Chang, Mark L. Kayton, Steven K. Libutti, John P. Connor, Terry W. Hensle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objective: Tissue welding using laser-activated protein solders may soon become an alternative to sutured tissue approximation. In most cases, approximating sutures are used both to align tissue edges and provide added tensile strength. Collateral thermal injury, however, may cause disruption of tissue alignment and weaken the tensile strength of sutures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser welding on the tensile strength of suture materials used in urologic surgery. Study Design/Material and Methods: Eleven types of sutures were exposed to diode laser energy (power density = 15.9 W/cm 2) for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Each suture was compared with and without the addition of dye-enhanced albumin- based solder. After exposure, each suture material was strained (2''/min) until untimate breakage on a tensometer and compared to untreated sutures using ANOVA. Results: The strength of undyed sutures were not significantly affected; however, violet and green-dyed sutures were in general weakened by laser exposure in the presence of dye-enhanced glue. Laser activation of the smallest caliber, dyed sutures (7-0) in the presence of glue caused the most significant loss of tensile strength of all sutures tested. Conclusion: These results indicate that the thermal effects of laser welding using our technique decrease the tensile strength of dyed sutures. A thermally resistant suture material (undyed or clear) may prevent disruption of wounds closed by laser welding techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-170
Number of pages4
JournalLasers in Surgery and Medicine
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Welding
Semiconductor Lasers
Tensile Strength
Urology
Adhesives
Sutures
Coloring Agents
Lasers
Hot Temperature
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • genitourinary
  • nonhealing
  • soldering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Effects of diode laser welding with dye-enhanced glue on tensile strength of sutures commonly used in urology. / Kirsch, Andrew J.; Chang, David T.; Kayton, Mark L.; Libutti, Steven K.; Connor, John P.; Hensle, Terry W.

In: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 2, 1996, p. 167-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kirsch, Andrew J. ; Chang, David T. ; Kayton, Mark L. ; Libutti, Steven K. ; Connor, John P. ; Hensle, Terry W. / Effects of diode laser welding with dye-enhanced glue on tensile strength of sutures commonly used in urology. In: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. 1996 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 167-170.
@article{f447265b93144aca90830ee5607826f1,
title = "Effects of diode laser welding with dye-enhanced glue on tensile strength of sutures commonly used in urology",
abstract = "Background and Objective: Tissue welding using laser-activated protein solders may soon become an alternative to sutured tissue approximation. In most cases, approximating sutures are used both to align tissue edges and provide added tensile strength. Collateral thermal injury, however, may cause disruption of tissue alignment and weaken the tensile strength of sutures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser welding on the tensile strength of suture materials used in urologic surgery. Study Design/Material and Methods: Eleven types of sutures were exposed to diode laser energy (power density = 15.9 W/cm 2) for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Each suture was compared with and without the addition of dye-enhanced albumin- based solder. After exposure, each suture material was strained (2''/min) until untimate breakage on a tensometer and compared to untreated sutures using ANOVA. Results: The strength of undyed sutures were not significantly affected; however, violet and green-dyed sutures were in general weakened by laser exposure in the presence of dye-enhanced glue. Laser activation of the smallest caliber, dyed sutures (7-0) in the presence of glue caused the most significant loss of tensile strength of all sutures tested. Conclusion: These results indicate that the thermal effects of laser welding using our technique decrease the tensile strength of dyed sutures. A thermally resistant suture material (undyed or clear) may prevent disruption of wounds closed by laser welding techniques.",
keywords = "genitourinary, nonhealing, soldering",
author = "Kirsch, {Andrew J.} and Chang, {David T.} and Kayton, {Mark L.} and Libutti, {Steven K.} and Connor, {John P.} and Hensle, {Terry W.}",
year = "1996",
doi = "10.1002/(SICI)1096-9101(1996)18:2<167::AID-LSM6>3.0.CO;2-Q",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "167--170",
journal = "Lasers in Surgery and Medicine",
issn = "0196-8092",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of diode laser welding with dye-enhanced glue on tensile strength of sutures commonly used in urology

AU - Kirsch, Andrew J.

AU - Chang, David T.

AU - Kayton, Mark L.

AU - Libutti, Steven K.

AU - Connor, John P.

AU - Hensle, Terry W.

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - Background and Objective: Tissue welding using laser-activated protein solders may soon become an alternative to sutured tissue approximation. In most cases, approximating sutures are used both to align tissue edges and provide added tensile strength. Collateral thermal injury, however, may cause disruption of tissue alignment and weaken the tensile strength of sutures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser welding on the tensile strength of suture materials used in urologic surgery. Study Design/Material and Methods: Eleven types of sutures were exposed to diode laser energy (power density = 15.9 W/cm 2) for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Each suture was compared with and without the addition of dye-enhanced albumin- based solder. After exposure, each suture material was strained (2''/min) until untimate breakage on a tensometer and compared to untreated sutures using ANOVA. Results: The strength of undyed sutures were not significantly affected; however, violet and green-dyed sutures were in general weakened by laser exposure in the presence of dye-enhanced glue. Laser activation of the smallest caliber, dyed sutures (7-0) in the presence of glue caused the most significant loss of tensile strength of all sutures tested. Conclusion: These results indicate that the thermal effects of laser welding using our technique decrease the tensile strength of dyed sutures. A thermally resistant suture material (undyed or clear) may prevent disruption of wounds closed by laser welding techniques.

AB - Background and Objective: Tissue welding using laser-activated protein solders may soon become an alternative to sutured tissue approximation. In most cases, approximating sutures are used both to align tissue edges and provide added tensile strength. Collateral thermal injury, however, may cause disruption of tissue alignment and weaken the tensile strength of sutures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser welding on the tensile strength of suture materials used in urologic surgery. Study Design/Material and Methods: Eleven types of sutures were exposed to diode laser energy (power density = 15.9 W/cm 2) for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Each suture was compared with and without the addition of dye-enhanced albumin- based solder. After exposure, each suture material was strained (2''/min) until untimate breakage on a tensometer and compared to untreated sutures using ANOVA. Results: The strength of undyed sutures were not significantly affected; however, violet and green-dyed sutures were in general weakened by laser exposure in the presence of dye-enhanced glue. Laser activation of the smallest caliber, dyed sutures (7-0) in the presence of glue caused the most significant loss of tensile strength of all sutures tested. Conclusion: These results indicate that the thermal effects of laser welding using our technique decrease the tensile strength of dyed sutures. A thermally resistant suture material (undyed or clear) may prevent disruption of wounds closed by laser welding techniques.

KW - genitourinary

KW - nonhealing

KW - soldering

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030068166&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030068166&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/(SICI)1096-9101(1996)18:2<167::AID-LSM6>3.0.CO;2-Q

DO - 10.1002/(SICI)1096-9101(1996)18:2<167::AID-LSM6>3.0.CO;2-Q

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 167

EP - 170

JO - Lasers in Surgery and Medicine

JF - Lasers in Surgery and Medicine

SN - 0196-8092

IS - 2

ER -