Effects of dietary modification and fish oil supplementation on dyslipoproteinemia in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus

Norman Todd Ilowite, N. Copperman, T. Leicht, T. Kwong, M. S. Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To determine if a program of dietary modification and fish oil supplementation is effective in treating the dyslipoproteinemia in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. Prospective clinical trial where each patient serves as his/her own control. Twenty-four consecutive adolescents fulfilling SLE classification criteria were screened with fasting lipid profiles. Patients were identified as having dyslipoproteinemia of active disease or of corticosteroid therapy. Patients were treated for 6 weeks with dietary modification and if dyslipoproteinemia did not normalize with another 6 weeks of dietary modification and fish oil supplementation. Results. Seventeen patients (71%) had dyslipoproteinemia; 10 of active disease, 4 of steroid therapy; 3 with a combined pattern. Eleven patients underwent dietary modification. There was a significant decrease in serum triglyceride concentrations (p < 0.05). Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol did not change significantly. A further significant decline in serum triglycerides was achieved with fish oil supplementation (p < 0.05). Five of the 11 patients who underwent treatment continued to have dyslipoproteinemia. Conclusion. Dyslipoproteinemia is common in pediatric SLE. Dietary modification and fish oil supplementation appear to be effective in improving serum lipid profiles, and blinded studies are warranted. A significant number of patients may require pharmacologic therapy for persistent dyslipoproteinemia to prevent complications of premature atherosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1347-1351
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume22
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Unsaturated Dietary Fats
Diet Therapy
Fish Oils
Dyslipidemias
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Pediatrics
Triglycerides
Serum
Lipids
Therapeutics
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Fasting
Atherosclerosis
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Steroids
Cholesterol
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Diet
  • Dyslipoproteinemia
  • Fish oil
  • Pediatric
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Ilowite, N. T., Copperman, N., Leicht, T., Kwong, T., & Jacobson, M. S. (1995). Effects of dietary modification and fish oil supplementation on dyslipoproteinemia in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Journal of Rheumatology, 22(7), 1347-1351.

Effects of dietary modification and fish oil supplementation on dyslipoproteinemia in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. / Ilowite, Norman Todd; Copperman, N.; Leicht, T.; Kwong, T.; Jacobson, M. S.

In: Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 22, No. 7, 1995, p. 1347-1351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ilowite, NT, Copperman, N, Leicht, T, Kwong, T & Jacobson, MS 1995, 'Effects of dietary modification and fish oil supplementation on dyslipoproteinemia in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus', Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 22, no. 7, pp. 1347-1351.
Ilowite, Norman Todd ; Copperman, N. ; Leicht, T. ; Kwong, T. ; Jacobson, M. S. / Effects of dietary modification and fish oil supplementation on dyslipoproteinemia in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. In: Journal of Rheumatology. 1995 ; Vol. 22, No. 7. pp. 1347-1351.
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