Effects of developmental manganese, stress, and the combination of both on monoamines, growth, and corticosterone

Charles V. Vorhees, Devon L. Graham, Robyn M. Amos-Kroohs, Amanda A. Braun, Curtis E. Grace, Tori L. Schaefer, Matthew R. Skelton, Keith M. Erikson, Michael Aschner, Michael T. Williams

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Abstract

Developmental exposure to manganese (Mn) or stress can each be detrimental to brain development. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to two housing conditions and Mn from postnatal day (P)4-28. Within each litter two males and two females were assigned to the following groups: 0 (vehicle), 50, or 100. mg/kg Mn by gavage every other day. Half the litters were reared in cages with standard bedding and half with no bedding. One pair/group in each litter had an acute shallow water stressor before tissue collection (i.e., standing in shallow water). Separate litters were assessed at P11, 19, or 29. Mn-treated rats raised in standard cages showed no change in baseline corticosterone but following acute stress increased more than controls on P19; no Mn effects were seen on P11 or P29. Mn increased neostriatal dopamine in females at P19 and norepinephrine at P11 and P29. Mn increased hippocampal dopamine at P11 and P29 and 5-HT at P29 regardless of housing or sex. Mn had no effect on hypothalamic dopamine, but increased norepinephrine in males at P29 and 5-HT in males at all ages irrespective of rearing condition. Barren reared rats showed no or opposite effects of Mn, i.e., barren rearing + Mn attenuated corticosterone increases to acute stress. Barren rearing also altered the Mn-induced changes in dopamine and norepinephrine in the neostriatum, but not in the hippocampus. Barren rearing caused a Mn-associated increase in hypothalamic dopamine at P19 and P29 not seen in standard reared Mn-treated groups. Developmental Mn alters monoamines and corticosterone as a function of age, stress (acute and chronic), and sex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1046-1061
Number of pages16
JournalToxicology Reports
Volume1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 16 2014

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Manganese
Corticosterone
Growth
Dopamine
Rats
Norepinephrine
Serotonin
Neostriatum
Water
Sprague Dawley Rats
Hippocampus
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Vorhees, C. V., Graham, D. L., Amos-Kroohs, R. M., Braun, A. A., Grace, C. E., Schaefer, T. L., ... Williams, M. T. (2014). Effects of developmental manganese, stress, and the combination of both on monoamines, growth, and corticosterone. Toxicology Reports, 1, 1046-1061. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxrep.2014.10.004

Effects of developmental manganese, stress, and the combination of both on monoamines, growth, and corticosterone. / Vorhees, Charles V.; Graham, Devon L.; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M.; Braun, Amanda A.; Grace, Curtis E.; Schaefer, Tori L.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Erikson, Keith M.; Aschner, Michael; Williams, Michael T.

In: Toxicology Reports, Vol. 1, 16.10.2014, p. 1046-1061.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vorhees, CV, Graham, DL, Amos-Kroohs, RM, Braun, AA, Grace, CE, Schaefer, TL, Skelton, MR, Erikson, KM, Aschner, M & Williams, MT 2014, 'Effects of developmental manganese, stress, and the combination of both on monoamines, growth, and corticosterone', Toxicology Reports, vol. 1, pp. 1046-1061. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxrep.2014.10.004
Vorhees, Charles V. ; Graham, Devon L. ; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M. ; Braun, Amanda A. ; Grace, Curtis E. ; Schaefer, Tori L. ; Skelton, Matthew R. ; Erikson, Keith M. ; Aschner, Michael ; Williams, Michael T. / Effects of developmental manganese, stress, and the combination of both on monoamines, growth, and corticosterone. In: Toxicology Reports. 2014 ; Vol. 1. pp. 1046-1061.
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