Effects of Cognitive Leisure Activity on Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

Takehiko Doi, Joe Verghese, Hyuma Makizako, Kota Tsutsumimoto, Ryo Hotta, Sho Nakakubo, Takao Suzuki, Hiroyuki Shimada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To test the hypothesis that a long-term, structured cognitive leisure activity program is more effective than a health education program at reducing the risk of further cognitive decline in older adults with mild cognitive impairment syndrome (MCI), a high risk for dementia. Design: A 3-arm, single-blind randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community. Participants: A total of 201 Japanese adults with MCI (mean age: 76.0 years, 52% women). Interventions: Participants were randomized into 1 of 2 cognitive leisure activity programs (60 minutes weekly for 40 weeks): dance (n = 67) and playing musical instruments (n = 67), or a health education control group (n = 67). Measurements: Primary outcomes were memory function changes at 40 weeks. Secondary outcomes included changes in Mini-Mental State Examination and nonmemory domain (Trail Making Tests A and B) scores. Results: At 40 weeks, the dance group showed improved memory recall scores compared with controls [mean change (SD): dance group 0.73 (1.9) vs controls 0.01 (1.9); P = .011], whereas the music group did not show an improvement compared with controls (P = .123). Both dance [mean change (SD): 0.29 (2.6); P = .026] and music groups [mean change (SD): 0.46 (2.1); P = .008] showed improved Mini-Mental State Examination scores compared with controls [mean change (SD): -0.36 (2.3)]. No difference in the nonmemory cognitive tests was observed. Conclusions: Long-term cognitive leisure activity programs involving dance or playing musical instruments resulted in improvements in memory and general cognitive function compared with a health education program in older adults with MCI. Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR UMIN000014261.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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Dancing
Leisure Activities
Cognition
Randomized Controlled Trials
Health Education
Music
Trail Making Test
Dementia
Cognitive Dysfunction
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Cognitive function
  • Dementia
  • MCI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Effects of Cognitive Leisure Activity on Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment : Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial. / Doi, Takehiko; Verghese, Joe; Makizako, Hyuma; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Suzuki, Takao; Shimada, Hiroyuki.

In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Doi, Takehiko ; Verghese, Joe ; Makizako, Hyuma ; Tsutsumimoto, Kota ; Hotta, Ryo ; Nakakubo, Sho ; Suzuki, Takao ; Shimada, Hiroyuki. / Effects of Cognitive Leisure Activity on Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment : Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial. In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. 2017.
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title = "Effects of Cognitive Leisure Activity on Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial",
abstract = "Objective: To test the hypothesis that a long-term, structured cognitive leisure activity program is more effective than a health education program at reducing the risk of further cognitive decline in older adults with mild cognitive impairment syndrome (MCI), a high risk for dementia. Design: A 3-arm, single-blind randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community. Participants: A total of 201 Japanese adults with MCI (mean age: 76.0 years, 52{\%} women). Interventions: Participants were randomized into 1 of 2 cognitive leisure activity programs (60 minutes weekly for 40 weeks): dance (n = 67) and playing musical instruments (n = 67), or a health education control group (n = 67). Measurements: Primary outcomes were memory function changes at 40 weeks. Secondary outcomes included changes in Mini-Mental State Examination and nonmemory domain (Trail Making Tests A and B) scores. Results: At 40 weeks, the dance group showed improved memory recall scores compared with controls [mean change (SD): dance group 0.73 (1.9) vs controls 0.01 (1.9); P = .011], whereas the music group did not show an improvement compared with controls (P = .123). Both dance [mean change (SD): 0.29 (2.6); P = .026] and music groups [mean change (SD): 0.46 (2.1); P = .008] showed improved Mini-Mental State Examination scores compared with controls [mean change (SD): -0.36 (2.3)]. No difference in the nonmemory cognitive tests was observed. Conclusions: Long-term cognitive leisure activity programs involving dance or playing musical instruments resulted in improvements in memory and general cognitive function compared with a health education program in older adults with MCI. Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR UMIN000014261.",
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N2 - Objective: To test the hypothesis that a long-term, structured cognitive leisure activity program is more effective than a health education program at reducing the risk of further cognitive decline in older adults with mild cognitive impairment syndrome (MCI), a high risk for dementia. Design: A 3-arm, single-blind randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community. Participants: A total of 201 Japanese adults with MCI (mean age: 76.0 years, 52% women). Interventions: Participants were randomized into 1 of 2 cognitive leisure activity programs (60 minutes weekly for 40 weeks): dance (n = 67) and playing musical instruments (n = 67), or a health education control group (n = 67). Measurements: Primary outcomes were memory function changes at 40 weeks. Secondary outcomes included changes in Mini-Mental State Examination and nonmemory domain (Trail Making Tests A and B) scores. Results: At 40 weeks, the dance group showed improved memory recall scores compared with controls [mean change (SD): dance group 0.73 (1.9) vs controls 0.01 (1.9); P = .011], whereas the music group did not show an improvement compared with controls (P = .123). Both dance [mean change (SD): 0.29 (2.6); P = .026] and music groups [mean change (SD): 0.46 (2.1); P = .008] showed improved Mini-Mental State Examination scores compared with controls [mean change (SD): -0.36 (2.3)]. No difference in the nonmemory cognitive tests was observed. Conclusions: Long-term cognitive leisure activity programs involving dance or playing musical instruments resulted in improvements in memory and general cognitive function compared with a health education program in older adults with MCI. Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR UMIN000014261.

AB - Objective: To test the hypothesis that a long-term, structured cognitive leisure activity program is more effective than a health education program at reducing the risk of further cognitive decline in older adults with mild cognitive impairment syndrome (MCI), a high risk for dementia. Design: A 3-arm, single-blind randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community. Participants: A total of 201 Japanese adults with MCI (mean age: 76.0 years, 52% women). Interventions: Participants were randomized into 1 of 2 cognitive leisure activity programs (60 minutes weekly for 40 weeks): dance (n = 67) and playing musical instruments (n = 67), or a health education control group (n = 67). Measurements: Primary outcomes were memory function changes at 40 weeks. Secondary outcomes included changes in Mini-Mental State Examination and nonmemory domain (Trail Making Tests A and B) scores. Results: At 40 weeks, the dance group showed improved memory recall scores compared with controls [mean change (SD): dance group 0.73 (1.9) vs controls 0.01 (1.9); P = .011], whereas the music group did not show an improvement compared with controls (P = .123). Both dance [mean change (SD): 0.29 (2.6); P = .026] and music groups [mean change (SD): 0.46 (2.1); P = .008] showed improved Mini-Mental State Examination scores compared with controls [mean change (SD): -0.36 (2.3)]. No difference in the nonmemory cognitive tests was observed. Conclusions: Long-term cognitive leisure activity programs involving dance or playing musical instruments resulted in improvements in memory and general cognitive function compared with a health education program in older adults with MCI. Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR UMIN000014261.

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