Effects of a Web-based Food Portion Training Program on Food Portion Estimation

William T. Riley, Jeannette Beasley, Allison Sowell, Albert Behar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Assess the effects of a prototype computerized food portion tutorial (CFPT). Design: Participants were randomly assigned to estimate portion sizes for selected food items either prior to or following CFPT training (between groups), and those estimating before CFPT training re-estimated portions after training (within groups). Setting: Research offices. Participants: Seventy-six adult participants without dietary restrictions. Intervention: The CFPT is a Web-based food portion training program that displays varied portions of 23 food items with user-controllable reference objects and viewing angles. Main Outcome Measures: Estimated vs. weighed portions of food items selected for a meal. Analysis: Nonparametric tests were performed on estimated vs. weighed portion differences and on accuracy ratios between and within groups. Results: A significant difference was found between conditions, both within and between groups, on the discrepancy between estimated and weighed portions for a number of the food items. Training exposure, however, resulted primarily in a shift from underestimation to overestimation, not more accurate estimation. Implications for Research and Practice: The CFPT produced a significant impact on food portion estimation but appeared to sensitize participants to underestimation errors, leading to overestimation errors. Computerization of food portion training programs holds promise for providing cost-efficient portion estimation training but requires further development and evaluation before being considered for clinical use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-76
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Food Chain
education programs
training program
food
Education
Food
portion size
dietary restriction
meals (menu)
prototypes
Portion Size
Group
testing
meals
Research
Meals
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • computer-assisted instruction
  • dietary assessment
  • education-internet
  • nutrition education research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Education
  • Food Science

Cite this

Effects of a Web-based Food Portion Training Program on Food Portion Estimation. / Riley, William T.; Beasley, Jeannette; Sowell, Allison; Behar, Albert.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 2, 03.2007, p. 70-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Riley, William T. ; Beasley, Jeannette ; Sowell, Allison ; Behar, Albert. / Effects of a Web-based Food Portion Training Program on Food Portion Estimation. In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. 2007 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 70-76.
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