Effect of reduced acclimation temperature on responses of frog cold receptors* * Present address: Department of Anatomy, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461, U.S.A.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. 1. Acclimation of Rana pipiens to 9·5°C increased maximum dynamic sensitivity (impulses/ °C per sec), increased the range of static sensitivity and decreased the temperature of peak static sensitivity of cold receptors when compared to those of warm-acclimated animals. 2. 2. Cold receptors of cold-acclimated animals were markedly less sensitive to the application of epinephrine to the inner skin surface than were animals acclimated to 23°C, and showed much less enhancement of maximum dynamic sensitivity by sympathetic stimulation. 3. 3. Since circulating catecholamines are known to be elevated in the cold-acclimated amphibian, the present results may be interpreted as evidencing hormonal modulation of sensory input.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-395
Number of pages5
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology -- Part A: Physiology
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1975
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acclimatization
Anura
Medicine
Anatomy
Animals
Temperature
Rana pipiens
Epinephrine
Catecholamines
Skin
Amphibians
Modulation

Keywords

  • cold acclimation
  • frog
  • Temperature receptors
  • temperature sense
  • thermoregulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "1. 1. Acclimation of Rana pipiens to 9·5°C increased maximum dynamic sensitivity (impulses/ °C per sec), increased the range of static sensitivity and decreased the temperature of peak static sensitivity of cold receptors when compared to those of warm-acclimated animals. 2. 2. Cold receptors of cold-acclimated animals were markedly less sensitive to the application of epinephrine to the inner skin surface than were animals acclimated to 23°C, and showed much less enhancement of maximum dynamic sensitivity by sympathetic stimulation. 3. 3. Since circulating catecholamines are known to be elevated in the cold-acclimated amphibian, the present results may be interpreted as evidencing hormonal modulation of sensory input.",
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T2 - Department of Anatomy, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461, U.S.A.

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N2 - 1. 1. Acclimation of Rana pipiens to 9·5°C increased maximum dynamic sensitivity (impulses/ °C per sec), increased the range of static sensitivity and decreased the temperature of peak static sensitivity of cold receptors when compared to those of warm-acclimated animals. 2. 2. Cold receptors of cold-acclimated animals were markedly less sensitive to the application of epinephrine to the inner skin surface than were animals acclimated to 23°C, and showed much less enhancement of maximum dynamic sensitivity by sympathetic stimulation. 3. 3. Since circulating catecholamines are known to be elevated in the cold-acclimated amphibian, the present results may be interpreted as evidencing hormonal modulation of sensory input.

AB - 1. 1. Acclimation of Rana pipiens to 9·5°C increased maximum dynamic sensitivity (impulses/ °C per sec), increased the range of static sensitivity and decreased the temperature of peak static sensitivity of cold receptors when compared to those of warm-acclimated animals. 2. 2. Cold receptors of cold-acclimated animals were markedly less sensitive to the application of epinephrine to the inner skin surface than were animals acclimated to 23°C, and showed much less enhancement of maximum dynamic sensitivity by sympathetic stimulation. 3. 3. Since circulating catecholamines are known to be elevated in the cold-acclimated amphibian, the present results may be interpreted as evidencing hormonal modulation of sensory input.

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KW - Temperature receptors

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