Effect of primary care intervention on breastfeeding duration and intensity

Karen A. Bonuck, Alison Stuebe, Josephine Barnett, Miriam H. Labbok, Jason Fletcher, Peter S. Bernstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We determined the effectiveness of primary care-based, and preand postnatal interventions to increase breastfeeding. Methods. We conducted 2 trials at obstetrics and gynecology practices in the Bronx, New York, from 2008 to 2011. The Provider Approaches to Improved Rates of Infant Nutrition and Growth Study (PAIRINGS) had 2 arms: usual care versus pre- and postnatal visits with a lactation consultant (LC) and electronically prompted guidance from prenatal care providers (EP). The Best Infant Nutrition for Good Outcomes (BINGO) study had 4 arms: usual care, LC alone, EP alone, or LC+EP. Results. In BINGO at 3 months, high intensity was greater for the LC+EP (odds ratio [OR] = 2.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 6.84) and LC (OR = 3.22; 95% CI = 1.14, 9.09) groups versus usual care, but not for the EP group alone. In PAIRINGS at 3 months, intervention rates exceeded usual care (OR = 2.86; 95% CI = 1.21, 6.76); the number needed to treat to prevent 1 dyad from nonexclusive breastfeeding at 3 months was 10.3 (95% CI = 5.6, 50.7). Conclusions. LCs integrated into routine care alone and combined with EP guidance from prenatal care providers increased breastfeeding intensity at 3 months postpartum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume104
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Consultants
Breast Feeding
Lactation
Primary Health Care
Prenatal Care
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Postnatal Care
Numbers Needed To Treat
Growth
Gynecology
Postpartum Period
Obstetrics
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effect of primary care intervention on breastfeeding duration and intensity. / Bonuck, Karen A.; Stuebe, Alison; Barnett, Josephine; Labbok, Miriam H.; Fletcher, Jason; Bernstein, Peter S.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 104, No. SUPPL. 1, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bonuck, Karen A. ; Stuebe, Alison ; Barnett, Josephine ; Labbok, Miriam H. ; Fletcher, Jason ; Bernstein, Peter S. / Effect of primary care intervention on breastfeeding duration and intensity. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2014 ; Vol. 104, No. SUPPL. 1.
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