Effect of neonatal circumcision on penile neurologic sensation

Clifford B. Bleustein, James D. Fogarty, Haftan Eckholdt, Joseph C. Arezzo, Arnold Melman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To evaluate penile sensory thresholds in neonatally circumcised and uncircumcised men. Methods. We evaluated 125 patients, 62 uncircumcised men and 63 neonatally circumcised men. All patients completed the Erectile Function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire. Of the 125 patients, 29 (International Index of Erectile Function score of between 25 and 30) were placed in the functional group, and 96 in the dysfunctional group. The patients were tested on the dorsal midline glans of the penis (foreskin retracted). Quantitative somatosensory testing was performed and included vibration, pressure, spatial perception, and warm and cold thermal thresholds. Results. In the functional group, t-test analysis demonstrated a significant (P <0.001) difference, with worse vibration and better pressure sensation for uncircumcised men. When controlling for age, hypertension, and diabetes, all t-test significance was lost. In the dysfunctional group, circumcised men (49 ± 16 years) were significantly younger (P <0.01) than uncircumcised men (56 ± 13 years). For the dysfunctional group, t-test analysis also demonstrated worse vibration sensation for uncircumcised men (P <0.01). Again, when controlling for age, hypertension, and diabetes, all t-test significance was lost. Conclusions. We present a comparative analysis of uncircumcised and circumcised men using a battery of quantitative somatosensory tests that evaluate the spectrum of small to large axon nerve fiber function. Our study controlled for factors, including age, erectile function status, diabetes, and hypertension, that have been shown to alter neurologic testing. In our study of neonatally circumcised men, we demonstrated that circumcision status does not significantly alter the quantitative somatosensory testing results at the glans penis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)773-777
Number of pages5
JournalUrology
Volume65
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nervous System
Vibration
Penis
Hypertension
Sensory Thresholds
Foreskin
Pressure
Age Factors
Nerve Fibers
Axons
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Bleustein, C. B., Fogarty, J. D., Eckholdt, H., Arezzo, J. C., & Melman, A. (2005). Effect of neonatal circumcision on penile neurologic sensation. Urology, 65(4), 773-777. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2004.11.007

Effect of neonatal circumcision on penile neurologic sensation. / Bleustein, Clifford B.; Fogarty, James D.; Eckholdt, Haftan; Arezzo, Joseph C.; Melman, Arnold.

In: Urology, Vol. 65, No. 4, 04.2005, p. 773-777.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bleustein, CB, Fogarty, JD, Eckholdt, H, Arezzo, JC & Melman, A 2005, 'Effect of neonatal circumcision on penile neurologic sensation', Urology, vol. 65, no. 4, pp. 773-777. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2004.11.007
Bleustein, Clifford B. ; Fogarty, James D. ; Eckholdt, Haftan ; Arezzo, Joseph C. ; Melman, Arnold. / Effect of neonatal circumcision on penile neurologic sensation. In: Urology. 2005 ; Vol. 65, No. 4. pp. 773-777.
@article{6b782164da54497daededab5d82030d8,
title = "Effect of neonatal circumcision on penile neurologic sensation",
abstract = "Objectives. To evaluate penile sensory thresholds in neonatally circumcised and uncircumcised men. Methods. We evaluated 125 patients, 62 uncircumcised men and 63 neonatally circumcised men. All patients completed the Erectile Function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire. Of the 125 patients, 29 (International Index of Erectile Function score of between 25 and 30) were placed in the functional group, and 96 in the dysfunctional group. The patients were tested on the dorsal midline glans of the penis (foreskin retracted). Quantitative somatosensory testing was performed and included vibration, pressure, spatial perception, and warm and cold thermal thresholds. Results. In the functional group, t-test analysis demonstrated a significant (P <0.001) difference, with worse vibration and better pressure sensation for uncircumcised men. When controlling for age, hypertension, and diabetes, all t-test significance was lost. In the dysfunctional group, circumcised men (49 ± 16 years) were significantly younger (P <0.01) than uncircumcised men (56 ± 13 years). For the dysfunctional group, t-test analysis also demonstrated worse vibration sensation for uncircumcised men (P <0.01). Again, when controlling for age, hypertension, and diabetes, all t-test significance was lost. Conclusions. We present a comparative analysis of uncircumcised and circumcised men using a battery of quantitative somatosensory tests that evaluate the spectrum of small to large axon nerve fiber function. Our study controlled for factors, including age, erectile function status, diabetes, and hypertension, that have been shown to alter neurologic testing. In our study of neonatally circumcised men, we demonstrated that circumcision status does not significantly alter the quantitative somatosensory testing results at the glans penis.",
author = "Bleustein, {Clifford B.} and Fogarty, {James D.} and Haftan Eckholdt and Arezzo, {Joseph C.} and Arnold Melman",
year = "2005",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.urology.2004.11.007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "65",
pages = "773--777",
journal = "Urology",
issn = "0090-4295",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of neonatal circumcision on penile neurologic sensation

AU - Bleustein, Clifford B.

AU - Fogarty, James D.

AU - Eckholdt, Haftan

AU - Arezzo, Joseph C.

AU - Melman, Arnold

PY - 2005/4

Y1 - 2005/4

N2 - Objectives. To evaluate penile sensory thresholds in neonatally circumcised and uncircumcised men. Methods. We evaluated 125 patients, 62 uncircumcised men and 63 neonatally circumcised men. All patients completed the Erectile Function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire. Of the 125 patients, 29 (International Index of Erectile Function score of between 25 and 30) were placed in the functional group, and 96 in the dysfunctional group. The patients were tested on the dorsal midline glans of the penis (foreskin retracted). Quantitative somatosensory testing was performed and included vibration, pressure, spatial perception, and warm and cold thermal thresholds. Results. In the functional group, t-test analysis demonstrated a significant (P <0.001) difference, with worse vibration and better pressure sensation for uncircumcised men. When controlling for age, hypertension, and diabetes, all t-test significance was lost. In the dysfunctional group, circumcised men (49 ± 16 years) were significantly younger (P <0.01) than uncircumcised men (56 ± 13 years). For the dysfunctional group, t-test analysis also demonstrated worse vibration sensation for uncircumcised men (P <0.01). Again, when controlling for age, hypertension, and diabetes, all t-test significance was lost. Conclusions. We present a comparative analysis of uncircumcised and circumcised men using a battery of quantitative somatosensory tests that evaluate the spectrum of small to large axon nerve fiber function. Our study controlled for factors, including age, erectile function status, diabetes, and hypertension, that have been shown to alter neurologic testing. In our study of neonatally circumcised men, we demonstrated that circumcision status does not significantly alter the quantitative somatosensory testing results at the glans penis.

AB - Objectives. To evaluate penile sensory thresholds in neonatally circumcised and uncircumcised men. Methods. We evaluated 125 patients, 62 uncircumcised men and 63 neonatally circumcised men. All patients completed the Erectile Function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire. Of the 125 patients, 29 (International Index of Erectile Function score of between 25 and 30) were placed in the functional group, and 96 in the dysfunctional group. The patients were tested on the dorsal midline glans of the penis (foreskin retracted). Quantitative somatosensory testing was performed and included vibration, pressure, spatial perception, and warm and cold thermal thresholds. Results. In the functional group, t-test analysis demonstrated a significant (P <0.001) difference, with worse vibration and better pressure sensation for uncircumcised men. When controlling for age, hypertension, and diabetes, all t-test significance was lost. In the dysfunctional group, circumcised men (49 ± 16 years) were significantly younger (P <0.01) than uncircumcised men (56 ± 13 years). For the dysfunctional group, t-test analysis also demonstrated worse vibration sensation for uncircumcised men (P <0.01). Again, when controlling for age, hypertension, and diabetes, all t-test significance was lost. Conclusions. We present a comparative analysis of uncircumcised and circumcised men using a battery of quantitative somatosensory tests that evaluate the spectrum of small to large axon nerve fiber function. Our study controlled for factors, including age, erectile function status, diabetes, and hypertension, that have been shown to alter neurologic testing. In our study of neonatally circumcised men, we demonstrated that circumcision status does not significantly alter the quantitative somatosensory testing results at the glans penis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=17144431458&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=17144431458&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.urology.2004.11.007

DO - 10.1016/j.urology.2004.11.007

M3 - Article

VL - 65

SP - 773

EP - 777

JO - Urology

JF - Urology

SN - 0090-4295

IS - 4

ER -