Effect of Medical Comorbidity on Response to Fluoxetine Augmentation or Dose Increase in Outpatients with Treatment-Resistant Depression

Roy H. Perlis, Dan V. Iosifescu, Jonathan Alpert, Andrew A. Nierenberg, Jerrold F. Rosenbaum, Maurizio Fava

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study assessed the effect of general medical comorbidity on response to next-step antidepressant treatments among subjects with major depressive disorder whose depression failed to respond to an 8-week open trial of 20 mg/ day of fluoxetine. Of the 386 outpatients in the open trial, 101 who remained depressed were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment with either an increased dose of fluoxetine or lithium or desipramine augmentation for 4 weeks. The Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS) was used to assess baseline general medical comorbidity, and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was used to assess depressive symptoms. Logistic regression analysis showed that CIRS score was not associated with likelihood of remission or premature study discontinuation. Medical comorbidity thus does not appear to be associated with significantly poorer outcome among patients whose major depressive disorder failed initially to respond to an initial trial of 20 mg/day of fluoxetine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-229
Number of pages6
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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