Effect of lead exposure on the activity of some hepatic enzymes in the rat

G. Dinari, Michael I. Cohen, H. McNamara, J. A. Kochen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Seven-day-old rats were fed 1% lead acetate tetrahydrate solution for 2, 4, or 7 days. Adult rats were fed the same lead solution for 6-8 wk. In the newborn rats, hepatic UDP-bilirubin glucuronyl transferase (GT) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP) activities were markedly increased. GT activity was increased after 4 days as compared to the controls (6.3 ± 0.3 vs. 4.3 ± 0.3, P < 0.001), and was maximal after 7 days of treatment (7.5 ± 0.4 vs. 4.6 ± 0.4, P < 0.001). GGTP activity was already maximally increased after 2 days of lead treatment (1.4 ± 0.2 vs. 0.4 ± 0.1, P < 0.001). Hepatic GT and GGTP activities were similarly increased in adult rats (7.9 ± 0.3 vs. 5.1 ± 0.1, P < 0.001, and 0.7 ± 0.1 vs. 0.4 ± 0.1, P < 0.005, respectively). In vitro studies adding lead citrate to liver homogenates did not produce any direct effect on GT and GGTP activities. The increase in hepatic GT and GGTP activities in lead treated animals appears to be a response to lead induced cellular damage or may result from interference with regulatory mechanisms responsible for production of these enzymes and not related to hepatic enzyme induction. The hepatic metabolism of drugs ingested by children with an increased lead burden may, therefore, be significantly altered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)644-646
Number of pages3
JournalPediatric Research
Volume13
Issue number5 I
StatePublished - 1979
Externally publishedYes

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gamma-Glutamyltransferase
Transferases
Liver
Enzymes
bilirubin glucuronoside glucuronosyltransferase
Glucuronosyltransferase
Enzyme Induction
Citric Acid
Lead
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Dinari, G., Cohen, M. I., McNamara, H., & Kochen, J. A. (1979). Effect of lead exposure on the activity of some hepatic enzymes in the rat. Pediatric Research, 13(5 I), 644-646.

Effect of lead exposure on the activity of some hepatic enzymes in the rat. / Dinari, G.; Cohen, Michael I.; McNamara, H.; Kochen, J. A.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 13, No. 5 I, 1979, p. 644-646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dinari, G, Cohen, MI, McNamara, H & Kochen, JA 1979, 'Effect of lead exposure on the activity of some hepatic enzymes in the rat', Pediatric Research, vol. 13, no. 5 I, pp. 644-646.
Dinari, G. ; Cohen, Michael I. ; McNamara, H. ; Kochen, J. A. / Effect of lead exposure on the activity of some hepatic enzymes in the rat. In: Pediatric Research. 1979 ; Vol. 13, No. 5 I. pp. 644-646.
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N2 - Seven-day-old rats were fed 1% lead acetate tetrahydrate solution for 2, 4, or 7 days. Adult rats were fed the same lead solution for 6-8 wk. In the newborn rats, hepatic UDP-bilirubin glucuronyl transferase (GT) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP) activities were markedly increased. GT activity was increased after 4 days as compared to the controls (6.3 ± 0.3 vs. 4.3 ± 0.3, P < 0.001), and was maximal after 7 days of treatment (7.5 ± 0.4 vs. 4.6 ± 0.4, P < 0.001). GGTP activity was already maximally increased after 2 days of lead treatment (1.4 ± 0.2 vs. 0.4 ± 0.1, P < 0.001). Hepatic GT and GGTP activities were similarly increased in adult rats (7.9 ± 0.3 vs. 5.1 ± 0.1, P < 0.001, and 0.7 ± 0.1 vs. 0.4 ± 0.1, P < 0.005, respectively). In vitro studies adding lead citrate to liver homogenates did not produce any direct effect on GT and GGTP activities. The increase in hepatic GT and GGTP activities in lead treated animals appears to be a response to lead induced cellular damage or may result from interference with regulatory mechanisms responsible for production of these enzymes and not related to hepatic enzyme induction. The hepatic metabolism of drugs ingested by children with an increased lead burden may, therefore, be significantly altered.

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