Effect of Dietary p-Aminobenzoic Acid on Murine Plasmodium yoelii Infection

Gregory A. Kicska, Li Min Ting, Vern L. Schramm, Kami Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plasmodia species, unlike humans, can utilize p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) for the de novo generation of folate. Plasmodial enzymes for the synthesis of PABA via the shikimate pathway are being investigated as novel targets for malaria chemotherapy. We show that, despite the presence of biosynthetic machinery to synthesize PABA, Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria species, requires exogenous dietary PABA for survival. Mice fed low-PABA diets do not die from lethal doses of P. yoelii. The initiation of a PABA-deficient diet after P. yoelii infection is established leads to the clearance of parasites and subsequent resistance to infection by P. yoelii. An intact immune system is not necessary for protection, given that mice with severe combined immunodeficiency were also protected by PABA-deficient diet. Our studies suggest that the PABA content in the diet will affect the host clearance of malaria parasites and may affect the efficacy of treatments that target the shikimate pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1776-1781
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume188
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2003

Fingerprint

Plasmodium yoelii
4-Aminobenzoic Acid
Malaria
Diet
Parasites
Severe Combined Immunodeficiency
Plasmodium
Folic Acid
Immune System
Rodentia
Drug Therapy
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Effect of Dietary p-Aminobenzoic Acid on Murine Plasmodium yoelii Infection. / Kicska, Gregory A.; Ting, Li Min; Schramm, Vern L.; Kim, Kami.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 188, No. 11, 01.12.2003, p. 1776-1781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kicska, Gregory A. ; Ting, Li Min ; Schramm, Vern L. ; Kim, Kami. / Effect of Dietary p-Aminobenzoic Acid on Murine Plasmodium yoelii Infection. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2003 ; Vol. 188, No. 11. pp. 1776-1781.
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