Effect of age on the refractive outcome of myopic photorefractive keratectomy

Sanjay N. Rao, Roy S. Chuck, Anthony H. Chang, Laurie Labree, Peter J. McDonnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of age on the outcome of myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Setting: University-based refractive surgery practice. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 197 eyes that had PRK for myopia was performed. Four groups of patients were compared: Group 1, patients <30 years (n = 35); Group 2, patients 31 to 40 years (n = 56); Group 3, patients 41 to 50 years (n = 47); Group 4, patients > 50 years (n = 59). The percentage of eyes with an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better and 20/40 or better and the percentage of eyes with spherical correction within ± 0.5 and ± 1.0 diopter (D) of the attempted correction were derived for each age group. The percentage of patients overcorrected and undercorrected by 1.0 D or more in each age group was also calculated. Results: The difference between the percentage of patients who achieved a visual acuity of 20/20 or better in Group 4 and in the younger groups was statistically significant at 3 months (P = .02) but not at 6 months (P = .70) and 12 months (P = .55). The difference between the percentage of patients who achieved an acuity of 20/40 or better was not significant at any time. The difference between the percentage of patients who were within ± 0.5 D of intended correction in Group 4 and in the younger groups was statistically significant at 3 months (P = .001), 6 months (P = .006), and 12 months (P = .008); the difference between the percentage of patients who were within ± 1.0 D of intended correction was not significant at any time. The difference between the percentage of patients overcorrected and undercorrected by 1.0 D or more in Group 4 and in the younger groups was not significant at any time. Conclusions: In the 3 younger groups, age did not significantly affect visual outcome or predictability. However, there was a significant difference between Group 4 and the 3 younger groups in predictability of the refractive outcome at 3, 6, and 12 months. Age may play a role in the outcome of refractive surgery. (C) 2000 ASCRS and ESCRS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-546
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Photorefractive Keratectomy
Refractive Surgical Procedures
Age Groups
Visual Acuity
Myopia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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Effect of age on the refractive outcome of myopic photorefractive keratectomy. / Rao, Sanjay N.; Chuck, Roy S.; Chang, Anthony H.; Labree, Laurie; McDonnell, Peter J.

In: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, Vol. 26, No. 4, 04.2000, p. 543-546.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rao, Sanjay N. ; Chuck, Roy S. ; Chang, Anthony H. ; Labree, Laurie ; McDonnell, Peter J. / Effect of age on the refractive outcome of myopic photorefractive keratectomy. In: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. 2000 ; Vol. 26, No. 4. pp. 543-546.
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abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the effect of age on the outcome of myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Setting: University-based refractive surgery practice. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 197 eyes that had PRK for myopia was performed. Four groups of patients were compared: Group 1, patients <30 years (n = 35); Group 2, patients 31 to 40 years (n = 56); Group 3, patients 41 to 50 years (n = 47); Group 4, patients > 50 years (n = 59). The percentage of eyes with an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better and 20/40 or better and the percentage of eyes with spherical correction within ± 0.5 and ± 1.0 diopter (D) of the attempted correction were derived for each age group. The percentage of patients overcorrected and undercorrected by 1.0 D or more in each age group was also calculated. Results: The difference between the percentage of patients who achieved a visual acuity of 20/20 or better in Group 4 and in the younger groups was statistically significant at 3 months (P = .02) but not at 6 months (P = .70) and 12 months (P = .55). The difference between the percentage of patients who achieved an acuity of 20/40 or better was not significant at any time. The difference between the percentage of patients who were within ± 0.5 D of intended correction in Group 4 and in the younger groups was statistically significant at 3 months (P = .001), 6 months (P = .006), and 12 months (P = .008); the difference between the percentage of patients who were within ± 1.0 D of intended correction was not significant at any time. The difference between the percentage of patients overcorrected and undercorrected by 1.0 D or more in Group 4 and in the younger groups was not significant at any time. Conclusions: In the 3 younger groups, age did not significantly affect visual outcome or predictability. However, there was a significant difference between Group 4 and the 3 younger groups in predictability of the refractive outcome at 3, 6, and 12 months. Age may play a role in the outcome of refractive surgery. (C) 2000 ASCRS and ESCRS.",
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N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the effect of age on the outcome of myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Setting: University-based refractive surgery practice. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 197 eyes that had PRK for myopia was performed. Four groups of patients were compared: Group 1, patients <30 years (n = 35); Group 2, patients 31 to 40 years (n = 56); Group 3, patients 41 to 50 years (n = 47); Group 4, patients > 50 years (n = 59). The percentage of eyes with an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better and 20/40 or better and the percentage of eyes with spherical correction within ± 0.5 and ± 1.0 diopter (D) of the attempted correction were derived for each age group. The percentage of patients overcorrected and undercorrected by 1.0 D or more in each age group was also calculated. Results: The difference between the percentage of patients who achieved a visual acuity of 20/20 or better in Group 4 and in the younger groups was statistically significant at 3 months (P = .02) but not at 6 months (P = .70) and 12 months (P = .55). The difference between the percentage of patients who achieved an acuity of 20/40 or better was not significant at any time. The difference between the percentage of patients who were within ± 0.5 D of intended correction in Group 4 and in the younger groups was statistically significant at 3 months (P = .001), 6 months (P = .006), and 12 months (P = .008); the difference between the percentage of patients who were within ± 1.0 D of intended correction was not significant at any time. The difference between the percentage of patients overcorrected and undercorrected by 1.0 D or more in Group 4 and in the younger groups was not significant at any time. Conclusions: In the 3 younger groups, age did not significantly affect visual outcome or predictability. However, there was a significant difference between Group 4 and the 3 younger groups in predictability of the refractive outcome at 3, 6, and 12 months. Age may play a role in the outcome of refractive surgery. (C) 2000 ASCRS and ESCRS.

AB - Purpose: To evaluate the effect of age on the outcome of myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Setting: University-based refractive surgery practice. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 197 eyes that had PRK for myopia was performed. Four groups of patients were compared: Group 1, patients <30 years (n = 35); Group 2, patients 31 to 40 years (n = 56); Group 3, patients 41 to 50 years (n = 47); Group 4, patients > 50 years (n = 59). The percentage of eyes with an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better and 20/40 or better and the percentage of eyes with spherical correction within ± 0.5 and ± 1.0 diopter (D) of the attempted correction were derived for each age group. The percentage of patients overcorrected and undercorrected by 1.0 D or more in each age group was also calculated. Results: The difference between the percentage of patients who achieved a visual acuity of 20/20 or better in Group 4 and in the younger groups was statistically significant at 3 months (P = .02) but not at 6 months (P = .70) and 12 months (P = .55). The difference between the percentage of patients who achieved an acuity of 20/40 or better was not significant at any time. The difference between the percentage of patients who were within ± 0.5 D of intended correction in Group 4 and in the younger groups was statistically significant at 3 months (P = .001), 6 months (P = .006), and 12 months (P = .008); the difference between the percentage of patients who were within ± 1.0 D of intended correction was not significant at any time. The difference between the percentage of patients overcorrected and undercorrected by 1.0 D or more in Group 4 and in the younger groups was not significant at any time. Conclusions: In the 3 younger groups, age did not significantly affect visual outcome or predictability. However, there was a significant difference between Group 4 and the 3 younger groups in predictability of the refractive outcome at 3, 6, and 12 months. Age may play a role in the outcome of refractive surgery. (C) 2000 ASCRS and ESCRS.

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