Early increases in concentrations of total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol in HIV-infected children following new exposure to antiretroviral therapy

Kevin A. Sztam, Hongyu Jiang, Andrea Jurgrau, Richard J. Deckelbaum, Marc D. Foca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease in adults infected with HIV. For children perinatally infected with HIV, ART exposure is lifelong and early-onset dyslipidemia could have significant long-term effects. We examined cholesterol levels in children during the first year after exposure to a new ART regimen (initiation or switch). In 52 children, total cholesterol increased by 30.5 and 43 mg/dL at 6 and 12 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol made the largest contribution, but high-density lipoprotein cholesterol also increased within months of therapy alteration. Early identification of these children and intervention could mediate potential increased risk for future cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)495-498
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • antiretroviral therapy
  • dyslipidemia
  • HDL
  • HIV
  • hypercholesterolemia
  • LDL

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Gastroenterology

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