Does the Difference in Fascial Closure Technique Affect Postoperative Pain?

Anna Lyapis, Amanda Ulrich, Rachel LaMonica, Chia Ling Kuo, Leah Kaye, Danielle Luciano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Study Objective: To compare postoperative incisional pain on postoperative days (PODs) 1 and 14 when using a fascial closure device (FCD) versus a traditional fascial closure (TFC) of the 12-mm upper quadrant port during robotic surgery. Time required to close the incision was also compared. Design: Randomized controlled trial (Canadian Task Force classification I). Setting: Two academic affiliated hospitals, The Hospital of Central Connecticut and The University of Connecticut. Patients: Women undergoing robotic surgery for benign indications by minimally invasive gynecologists at our institutions between November 2012 and October 2014 were enrolled in the study at their preoperative visit. Interventions: Patients were randomized to either an FCD or TFC immediately before closure of the fascial incision. Pain score using a 10-point analog pain scale was recorded on POD 1 and POD 14. Time to close the fascial incision, length of surgery, and body mass index were also recorded. Measurements and Main Results: Sixty-seven patients were enrolled, and 65 were randomized at the time of the fascial closure, whereas 2 enrolled patients converted to laparotomy. Statistical analysis demonstrated that pain scores differed by fascial closure technique. Mean pain scores on POD 1 were 3.43 ± 2.48 and 2.06 ± 2.03 for the FCD and TFC, respectively (p =.028). On POD 14 the mean pain scores were 1.97 ± 2.48 and.83 ± 1.42 for the FCD and TFC, respectively (p =.102). Times to close fascia were 106.5 ± 102.28 seconds and 141.97 ± 102.85 seconds for the FCD and TFC, respectively (p =.138). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that at POD 1 the use of the fascia closure device results in higher pain scores without a significant difference in closure time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1190-1194
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Postoperative Pain
Equipment and Supplies
Pain
Fascia
Robotics
Advisory Committees
Pain Measurement
Laparotomy
Body Mass Index
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • Fascial closure device
  • Postoperative pain
  • Robotic surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Does the Difference in Fascial Closure Technique Affect Postoperative Pain? / Lyapis, Anna; Ulrich, Amanda; LaMonica, Rachel; Kuo, Chia Ling; Kaye, Leah; Luciano, Danielle.

In: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology, Vol. 24, No. 7, 01.11.2017, p. 1190-1194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyapis, Anna ; Ulrich, Amanda ; LaMonica, Rachel ; Kuo, Chia Ling ; Kaye, Leah ; Luciano, Danielle. / Does the Difference in Fascial Closure Technique Affect Postoperative Pain?. In: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 7. pp. 1190-1194.
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title = "Does the Difference in Fascial Closure Technique Affect Postoperative Pain?",
abstract = "Study Objective: To compare postoperative incisional pain on postoperative days (PODs) 1 and 14 when using a fascial closure device (FCD) versus a traditional fascial closure (TFC) of the 12-mm upper quadrant port during robotic surgery. Time required to close the incision was also compared. Design: Randomized controlled trial (Canadian Task Force classification I). Setting: Two academic affiliated hospitals, The Hospital of Central Connecticut and The University of Connecticut. Patients: Women undergoing robotic surgery for benign indications by minimally invasive gynecologists at our institutions between November 2012 and October 2014 were enrolled in the study at their preoperative visit. Interventions: Patients were randomized to either an FCD or TFC immediately before closure of the fascial incision. Pain score using a 10-point analog pain scale was recorded on POD 1 and POD 14. Time to close the fascial incision, length of surgery, and body mass index were also recorded. Measurements and Main Results: Sixty-seven patients were enrolled, and 65 were randomized at the time of the fascial closure, whereas 2 enrolled patients converted to laparotomy. Statistical analysis demonstrated that pain scores differed by fascial closure technique. Mean pain scores on POD 1 were 3.43 ± 2.48 and 2.06 ± 2.03 for the FCD and TFC, respectively (p =.028). On POD 14 the mean pain scores were 1.97 ± 2.48 and.83 ± 1.42 for the FCD and TFC, respectively (p =.102). Times to close fascia were 106.5 ± 102.28 seconds and 141.97 ± 102.85 seconds for the FCD and TFC, respectively (p =.138). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that at POD 1 the use of the fascia closure device results in higher pain scores without a significant difference in closure time.",
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