Documentation of asthma control and severity in pediatrics: analysis of national office-based visits

Sanika Rege, Abhishek Kavati, Benjamin Ortiz, Giselle Mosnaim, Michael D. Cabana, Kevin Murphy, Rajender R. Aparasu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the extent of documentation of asthma control and severity and associated characteristics among pediatric asthma patients in office-based settings. Methods: This cross-sectional study utilized data from the 2012–2015 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). Patients aged 6–17 years with a diagnosis of asthma were included. Weighted descriptive analysis examined the extent of documentation and uncontrolled asthma; while logistic regression evaluated associated characteristics. Results: Overall, there were 2.47 million (95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 2.04–2.90) average annual visits with asthma as a primary diagnosis. Asthma control and severity was documented in only 36.1% and 33.8% of the visits, respectively. An established patient (odds ratio, OR = 3.81), Hispanic ethnicity (OR = 2.10), chronic sinusitis (OR = 5.59), and visits in the Northeast (OR = 2.12) and Midwest (OR = 2.25) regions had higher odds of documented asthma control status, whereas undocumented asthma severity (OR = 0.02), and visits in spring (OR = 0.34), had lower odds. Osteopathic doctors (OR = 0.18), visits in the Northeast region (OR = 0.23), chronic sinusitis (OR = 0.08), and undocumented asthma control status (OR = 0.03) had lower odds of documented asthma severity, whereas visits in spring (OR = 3.88) and autumn (OR = 3.32) had higher odds. Moderate/severe persistent asthma (OR = 15.35) had higher odds of uncontrolled asthma (as compared to intermittent asthma), while visits in the summer (OR = 0.14) had lower odds. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest a critical need to increase the documentation of asthma severity and control to improve quality of asthma care in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Asthma
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Office Visits
Documentation
Asthma
Pediatrics
Sinusitis
Health Care Surveys
Quality of Health Care
Hispanic Americans

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • asthma control
  • asthma severity
  • documentation
  • pediatric
  • uncontrolled asthma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Documentation of asthma control and severity in pediatrics : analysis of national office-based visits. / Rege, Sanika; Kavati, Abhishek; Ortiz, Benjamin; Mosnaim, Giselle; Cabana, Michael D.; Murphy, Kevin; Aparasu, Rajender R.

In: Journal of Asthma, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rege, Sanika ; Kavati, Abhishek ; Ortiz, Benjamin ; Mosnaim, Giselle ; Cabana, Michael D. ; Murphy, Kevin ; Aparasu, Rajender R. / Documentation of asthma control and severity in pediatrics : analysis of national office-based visits. In: Journal of Asthma. 2019.
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