Do Urban Minority Parents and Children Agree on Asthma Symptoms with Exercise, Worries, and Confidence in Disease Management?

Florinda Islamovic, Ellen J. Silver, Marina Reznik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Providers commonly rely on parent reports of a child's asthma symptoms; however, children as young as 7 years can report on their own health. Our study compared parent and child reports of asthma symptoms with exercise, worries about developing an asthma attack, and confidence in disease management. Methods: We recruited children ages 7 to 10 years with asthma from 4 Bronx, NY, schools, as well as their parents. The parents and children completed interview surveys with parallel questions regarding perceived asthma symptoms, asthma-related worries, and confidence in disease management. We used McNemar tests for paired data to compare parent and child responses. Results: We analyzed data for 105 parent-child pairs. Mean child age was 8.5 years (standard deviation, 0.99); 53% were male, and 82% were Hispanic. Children were more likely than their parents to report ever having an exercise-induced asthma attack (85% vs 48%; P < .001) and that they “worry a lot” about developing an asthma attack during exercise (63% vs 45%; P = .01). Children felt more confident about using an inhaler correctly (76% of the children were “very sure” vs 60% of the parents; P = .009) and were more likely to report having an inhaler available in case of an attack (38% of the children were “very sure” vs 20% of the parents; P = .003). Conclusions: In this school-based sample of urban children with asthma, we found disagreement between parent and child reports of symptoms with exercise, worry about developing an attack, and confidence in medication use. These findings suggest that including child reports during history taking could help providers identify children in need of enhanced asthma management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Disease Management
Asthma
Parents
Exercise
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Exercise-Induced Asthma
Hispanic Americans

Keywords

  • asthma
  • caregivers
  • parent-child agreement
  • pediatric
  • urban

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

@article{f0ae02708e5e43d7ae71f9b7aef4bb9f,
title = "Do Urban Minority Parents and Children Agree on Asthma Symptoms with Exercise, Worries, and Confidence in Disease Management?",
abstract = "Objective: Providers commonly rely on parent reports of a child's asthma symptoms; however, children as young as 7 years can report on their own health. Our study compared parent and child reports of asthma symptoms with exercise, worries about developing an asthma attack, and confidence in disease management. Methods: We recruited children ages 7 to 10 years with asthma from 4 Bronx, NY, schools, as well as their parents. The parents and children completed interview surveys with parallel questions regarding perceived asthma symptoms, asthma-related worries, and confidence in disease management. We used McNemar tests for paired data to compare parent and child responses. Results: We analyzed data for 105 parent-child pairs. Mean child age was 8.5 years (standard deviation, 0.99); 53{\%} were male, and 82{\%} were Hispanic. Children were more likely than their parents to report ever having an exercise-induced asthma attack (85{\%} vs 48{\%}; P < .001) and that they “worry a lot” about developing an asthma attack during exercise (63{\%} vs 45{\%}; P = .01). Children felt more confident about using an inhaler correctly (76{\%} of the children were “very sure” vs 60{\%} of the parents; P = .009) and were more likely to report having an inhaler available in case of an attack (38{\%} of the children were “very sure” vs 20{\%} of the parents; P = .003). Conclusions: In this school-based sample of urban children with asthma, we found disagreement between parent and child reports of symptoms with exercise, worry about developing an attack, and confidence in medication use. These findings suggest that including child reports during history taking could help providers identify children in need of enhanced asthma management.",
keywords = "asthma, caregivers, parent-child agreement, pediatric, urban",
author = "Florinda Islamovic and Silver, {Ellen J.} and Marina Reznik",
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AU - Silver, Ellen J.

AU - Reznik, Marina

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N2 - Objective: Providers commonly rely on parent reports of a child's asthma symptoms; however, children as young as 7 years can report on their own health. Our study compared parent and child reports of asthma symptoms with exercise, worries about developing an asthma attack, and confidence in disease management. Methods: We recruited children ages 7 to 10 years with asthma from 4 Bronx, NY, schools, as well as their parents. The parents and children completed interview surveys with parallel questions regarding perceived asthma symptoms, asthma-related worries, and confidence in disease management. We used McNemar tests for paired data to compare parent and child responses. Results: We analyzed data for 105 parent-child pairs. Mean child age was 8.5 years (standard deviation, 0.99); 53% were male, and 82% were Hispanic. Children were more likely than their parents to report ever having an exercise-induced asthma attack (85% vs 48%; P < .001) and that they “worry a lot” about developing an asthma attack during exercise (63% vs 45%; P = .01). Children felt more confident about using an inhaler correctly (76% of the children were “very sure” vs 60% of the parents; P = .009) and were more likely to report having an inhaler available in case of an attack (38% of the children were “very sure” vs 20% of the parents; P = .003). Conclusions: In this school-based sample of urban children with asthma, we found disagreement between parent and child reports of symptoms with exercise, worry about developing an attack, and confidence in medication use. These findings suggest that including child reports during history taking could help providers identify children in need of enhanced asthma management.

AB - Objective: Providers commonly rely on parent reports of a child's asthma symptoms; however, children as young as 7 years can report on their own health. Our study compared parent and child reports of asthma symptoms with exercise, worries about developing an asthma attack, and confidence in disease management. Methods: We recruited children ages 7 to 10 years with asthma from 4 Bronx, NY, schools, as well as their parents. The parents and children completed interview surveys with parallel questions regarding perceived asthma symptoms, asthma-related worries, and confidence in disease management. We used McNemar tests for paired data to compare parent and child responses. Results: We analyzed data for 105 parent-child pairs. Mean child age was 8.5 years (standard deviation, 0.99); 53% were male, and 82% were Hispanic. Children were more likely than their parents to report ever having an exercise-induced asthma attack (85% vs 48%; P < .001) and that they “worry a lot” about developing an asthma attack during exercise (63% vs 45%; P = .01). Children felt more confident about using an inhaler correctly (76% of the children were “very sure” vs 60% of the parents; P = .009) and were more likely to report having an inhaler available in case of an attack (38% of the children were “very sure” vs 20% of the parents; P = .003). Conclusions: In this school-based sample of urban children with asthma, we found disagreement between parent and child reports of symptoms with exercise, worry about developing an attack, and confidence in medication use. These findings suggest that including child reports during history taking could help providers identify children in need of enhanced asthma management.

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