Do elevated hematocrits prolong the PT/aPTT?

Melissa Austin, Chris Ferrell, Morayma Reyes Gil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines require special processing of whole blood specimens with hematocrits greater than 55% due to the possibility of spurious prolongation of routine coagulation studies (PT, aPTT). As samples with hematocrits above 60% are rare at our institution, our study seeks to determine the effect of relative citrate excess on routine coagulation studies in samples with hematocrits of 60% to determine whether special processing is necessary. A calculated volume of 3.2% citrate was added to 1 mL aliquots of 40 whole blood samples in citrated tubes from adult patients to simulate a hematocrit of 60%. A dilutional control was created by adding an equivalent volume of saline to a separate 1 mL aliquot. Routine coagulation studies (PT, aPTT) were run on both samples on the STA Compact Analyzer in accordance with manufacturer instructions. While a paired Student's t-test demonstrated a clinically significant change in both PT and aPTT with the addition of citrate (p = 0.0002 for PT and p = 0.0234 for aPTT), clinical management would not have been altered by any observed change. More interestingly, we observed a shortening of 27/40 PTs and 23/40 aPTTs rather than the expected prolongation. Based on our data, no adjustment of citrate volume appears to be necessary in samples with hematocrits less than or equal to 60%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-94
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Laboratory Science
Volume26
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Hematocrit
Citric Acid
Coagulation
Blood
Processing
Students
Research Design
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Do elevated hematocrits prolong the PT/aPTT? / Austin, Melissa; Ferrell, Chris; Reyes Gil, Morayma.

In: Clinical Laboratory Science, Vol. 26, No. 2, 03.2013, p. 89-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Austin, M, Ferrell, C & Reyes Gil, M 2013, 'Do elevated hematocrits prolong the PT/aPTT?', Clinical Laboratory Science, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 89-94.
Austin, Melissa ; Ferrell, Chris ; Reyes Gil, Morayma. / Do elevated hematocrits prolong the PT/aPTT?. In: Clinical Laboratory Science. 2013 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 89-94.
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