Distribution of febrile seizure duration and associations with development

Dale C. Hesdorffer, Emma K T Benn, Emilia Bagiella, Douglas Nordli, John Pellock, Veronica Hinton, Shlomo Shinnar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: In prior studies of febrile seizures (FSs), prolonged FSs were defined, absent empirical evidence, as lasting 10 or 15 minutes or more. We assessed the distribution of FS duration in a cohort with first FSs, and the association between FS duration and baseline characteristics of the children. Methods: We calculated the observed cumulative probability, S(t), that a FS would last at least t minutes, S(t) = exp(-t/t). Data were also fit using a model obtained as the sum of 2 exponential distributions (S[t] = αexp[-t/t1] + [1 - α]exp[-t/t2]). After assessing the best fit, the cutoff defining long FS was determined. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between long FSs and baseline characteristics, behavior, and development. Results: In 158 children with a first FS, median duration was 4.0 minutes. Duration of FS was best fit by a 2-component mixture exponential model. Using this model, we identified 1 population that accounts for 82.3% of FSs and has a mean duration of 3.8 minutes (short FS) and a second population that accounts for 17.7% of FSs and has a mean duration of 39.8 minutes (long FS). Long FSs were significantly associated with developmental delay (p = 0.010) and delays and younger age at first FS (p = 0.048). Interpretation: Like the distribution of afebrile seizure duration in children, the distribution of first FS duration is best modeled by assuming 2 populations. Developmental delay and younger age are associated with prolonged FSs. Our data lend further support to defining 10 minutes as the upper limit for a simple FS. ANN NEUROL 2011

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-100
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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Febrile Seizures
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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Hesdorffer, D. C., Benn, E. K. T., Bagiella, E., Nordli, D., Pellock, J., Hinton, V., & Shinnar, S. (2011). Distribution of febrile seizure duration and associations with development. Annals of Neurology, 70(1), 93-100. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.22368

Distribution of febrile seizure duration and associations with development. / Hesdorffer, Dale C.; Benn, Emma K T; Bagiella, Emilia; Nordli, Douglas; Pellock, John; Hinton, Veronica; Shinnar, Shlomo.

In: Annals of Neurology, Vol. 70, No. 1, 07.2011, p. 93-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hesdorffer, DC, Benn, EKT, Bagiella, E, Nordli, D, Pellock, J, Hinton, V & Shinnar, S 2011, 'Distribution of febrile seizure duration and associations with development', Annals of Neurology, vol. 70, no. 1, pp. 93-100. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.22368
Hesdorffer DC, Benn EKT, Bagiella E, Nordli D, Pellock J, Hinton V et al. Distribution of febrile seizure duration and associations with development. Annals of Neurology. 2011 Jul;70(1):93-100. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.22368
Hesdorffer, Dale C. ; Benn, Emma K T ; Bagiella, Emilia ; Nordli, Douglas ; Pellock, John ; Hinton, Veronica ; Shinnar, Shlomo. / Distribution of febrile seizure duration and associations with development. In: Annals of Neurology. 2011 ; Vol. 70, No. 1. pp. 93-100.
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