Dispersed cells prepared from human parathyroid glands

distinct calcium sensitivity of adenomas vs. primary hyperplasia

E. M. Brown, M. F. Brennan, S. Hurwitz, R. Windeck, S. J. Marx, Allen M. Spiegel, J. O. Koehler, D. G. Gardner, G. D. Aurbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dispersed parathyroid cells were prepared by digestion with collagenase and DNase of parathyroid glands of patients with adenoma or primary hyperplasia. Yields of 50-100 million cells/g of tissue were obtained and the cells were viable by morphologic (95-100% trypan blue exclusions) and functional criteria [linear release of parathyroid hormone (PTH) responsive to ambient calcium concentration]. Cells prepared from 7 of 9 hyperplastic and 8 of 12 adenomatous glands were suppressible 50% (52-90%) or more by calcium. Cells from hyperplastic glands, however, were suppressed by significantly lower concentrations of calcium than those from adenomas and resembled normal bovine parathyroid cells in this respect. These results suggested that a 'set-point' error in calcium regulated PTH release might contribute to the pathophysiology of parathyroid adenomas. Cells from 2 of 9 hyperplastic and 4 of 12 adenomatous glands, on the other hand, were suppressible less than 50% (0-48%) by high calcium concentrations, indicating that some abnormal parathyroid glands may function in a truly autonomous fashion. Preliminary immunologic studies showed that incubation media from dispersed cells reacted with either N- or C-terminal- directed antisera and in parallel with bPTH (1-84). In addition, elevated calcium concentrations suppressed immunoreactive PTH release from a preparation of dispersed cells similarly, whether measured by the N- or C-specific assay.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-276
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume46
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1978
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Parathyroid Glands
Adenoma
Hyperplasia
Calcium
Parathyroid Hormone
Trypan Blue
Deoxyribonucleases
Collagenases
Immune Sera
Assays
Parathyroid Neoplasms
Tissue
Digestion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Dispersed cells prepared from human parathyroid glands : distinct calcium sensitivity of adenomas vs. primary hyperplasia. / Brown, E. M.; Brennan, M. F.; Hurwitz, S.; Windeck, R.; Marx, S. J.; Spiegel, Allen M.; Koehler, J. O.; Gardner, D. G.; Aurbach, G. D.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 46, No. 2, 1978, p. 267-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, EM, Brennan, MF, Hurwitz, S, Windeck, R, Marx, SJ, Spiegel, AM, Koehler, JO, Gardner, DG & Aurbach, GD 1978, 'Dispersed cells prepared from human parathyroid glands: distinct calcium sensitivity of adenomas vs. primary hyperplasia', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 267-276.
Brown, E. M. ; Brennan, M. F. ; Hurwitz, S. ; Windeck, R. ; Marx, S. J. ; Spiegel, Allen M. ; Koehler, J. O. ; Gardner, D. G. ; Aurbach, G. D. / Dispersed cells prepared from human parathyroid glands : distinct calcium sensitivity of adenomas vs. primary hyperplasia. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1978 ; Vol. 46, No. 2. pp. 267-276.
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abstract = "Dispersed parathyroid cells were prepared by digestion with collagenase and DNase of parathyroid glands of patients with adenoma or primary hyperplasia. Yields of 50-100 million cells/g of tissue were obtained and the cells were viable by morphologic (95-100{\%} trypan blue exclusions) and functional criteria [linear release of parathyroid hormone (PTH) responsive to ambient calcium concentration]. Cells prepared from 7 of 9 hyperplastic and 8 of 12 adenomatous glands were suppressible 50{\%} (52-90{\%}) or more by calcium. Cells from hyperplastic glands, however, were suppressed by significantly lower concentrations of calcium than those from adenomas and resembled normal bovine parathyroid cells in this respect. These results suggested that a 'set-point' error in calcium regulated PTH release might contribute to the pathophysiology of parathyroid adenomas. Cells from 2 of 9 hyperplastic and 4 of 12 adenomatous glands, on the other hand, were suppressible less than 50{\%} (0-48{\%}) by high calcium concentrations, indicating that some abnormal parathyroid glands may function in a truly autonomous fashion. Preliminary immunologic studies showed that incubation media from dispersed cells reacted with either N- or C-terminal- directed antisera and in parallel with bPTH (1-84). In addition, elevated calcium concentrations suppressed immunoreactive PTH release from a preparation of dispersed cells similarly, whether measured by the N- or C-specific assay.",
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