Diplopia in a patient with carcinomatous meningitis

A case report and review of the literature

Andrew K. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a patient with a history of malignancy, an isolated neurologic sign or symptom may indicate metastasis to the central nervous system. To exclude this possibility, a lumbar puncture should still be performed after a nondiagnostic cranial computed tomography (CT) scan even in the absence of signs of infection. A case is presented of a 59 year-old man recently diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with the sole complaint of diplopia. Examination was unremarkable except for a left abducens nerve palsy. Cranial CT scan was normal but initial cerebrospinal fluid results were suggestive of carcinomatous meningitis, and cytology results later confirmed this diagnosis. A review of diplopia and carcinomatous meningitis is presented, along with a suggested conservative diagnostic algorithm for cancer patients presenting with neurologic signs or symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-354
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Meningeal Carcinomatosis
Diplopia
Neurologic Manifestations
Tomography
Abducens Nerve Diseases
Spinal Puncture
Delayed Diagnosis
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Cell Biology
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Hospital Emergency Service
Neoplasms
Central Nervous System
Neoplasm Metastasis
Infection

Keywords

  • Carcinomatous meningitis
  • Diplopia
  • Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis
  • Leptomeningeal metastasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Diplopia in a patient with carcinomatous meningitis : A case report and review of the literature. / Chang, Andrew K.

In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 4, 11.2002, p. 351-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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