Diffuse Calcifications of the Spleen

A Novel Association with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Arlene Tan Tieng, Cheryl A. Sadow, Jay G. Hochsztein, Chaim Putterman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: While anatomical and physiological changes in the spleen are reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex autoimmune disease that can affect most organ systems, calcifications have not been described as a characteristic feature. We report 4 lupus patients with extensive splenic calcifications with no apparent cause except for their primary disease. The relevant literature on calcifications of the spleen in SLE is also reviewed. Methods: Four lupus patients with extensive splenic calcifications are described, identified by radiologists at 2 large urban academic centers. In addition, the relevant literature was reviewed (PubMed search 1947 through May 2010) using the following terms: "lupus," "spleen," and "calcified," "calcification," "calcifications," or "microcalcifications." English-language case reports and series were selected. Results: Four lupus patients were found to have a unique pattern of splenic calcifications. The age range was 36 to 73 years. Two of the patients were women, and 1 of these had SLE and limited systemic sclerosis. On reviewing the literature, 6 additional cases of lupus and splenic calcifications were found, 1 of which had pathologic assessment of the spleen on autopsy. The incidence of infection was apparently not increased in affected patients. Conclusions: A unique pattern of calcifications of the spleen may be found in lupus patients, which can suggest the diagnosis of the underlying connective tissue disease. Whether splenic calcification can predispose to hyposplenism remains to be determined. While the exact significance of diffuse splenic calcification is still unknown, this unique radiologic finding may be a result of the disease process itself.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-193
Number of pages7
JournalSeminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Spleen
Calcinosis
Connective Tissue Diseases
Systemic Scleroderma
PubMed
Autoimmune Diseases
Autopsy
Language
Incidence
Infection

Keywords

  • Calcifications
  • Imaging
  • Microcalcifications
  • Spleen
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Diffuse Calcifications of the Spleen : A Novel Association with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. / Tieng, Arlene Tan; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Hochsztein, Jay G.; Putterman, Chaim.

In: Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 41, No. 2, 10.2011, p. 187-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tieng, Arlene Tan ; Sadow, Cheryl A. ; Hochsztein, Jay G. ; Putterman, Chaim. / Diffuse Calcifications of the Spleen : A Novel Association with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. In: Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism. 2011 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 187-193.
@article{8c9fc65ac7ea4f07b43bef7438095ddf,
title = "Diffuse Calcifications of the Spleen: A Novel Association with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus",
abstract = "Objectives: While anatomical and physiological changes in the spleen are reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex autoimmune disease that can affect most organ systems, calcifications have not been described as a characteristic feature. We report 4 lupus patients with extensive splenic calcifications with no apparent cause except for their primary disease. The relevant literature on calcifications of the spleen in SLE is also reviewed. Methods: Four lupus patients with extensive splenic calcifications are described, identified by radiologists at 2 large urban academic centers. In addition, the relevant literature was reviewed (PubMed search 1947 through May 2010) using the following terms: {"}lupus,{"} {"}spleen,{"} and {"}calcified,{"} {"}calcification,{"} {"}calcifications,{"} or {"}microcalcifications.{"} English-language case reports and series were selected. Results: Four lupus patients were found to have a unique pattern of splenic calcifications. The age range was 36 to 73 years. Two of the patients were women, and 1 of these had SLE and limited systemic sclerosis. On reviewing the literature, 6 additional cases of lupus and splenic calcifications were found, 1 of which had pathologic assessment of the spleen on autopsy. The incidence of infection was apparently not increased in affected patients. Conclusions: A unique pattern of calcifications of the spleen may be found in lupus patients, which can suggest the diagnosis of the underlying connective tissue disease. Whether splenic calcification can predispose to hyposplenism remains to be determined. While the exact significance of diffuse splenic calcification is still unknown, this unique radiologic finding may be a result of the disease process itself.",
keywords = "Calcifications, Imaging, Microcalcifications, Spleen, Systemic lupus erythematosus",
author = "Tieng, {Arlene Tan} and Sadow, {Cheryl A.} and Hochsztein, {Jay G.} and Chaim Putterman",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.semarthrit.2010.10.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "187--193",
journal = "Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism",
issn = "0049-0172",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diffuse Calcifications of the Spleen

T2 - A Novel Association with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

AU - Tieng, Arlene Tan

AU - Sadow, Cheryl A.

AU - Hochsztein, Jay G.

AU - Putterman, Chaim

PY - 2011/10

Y1 - 2011/10

N2 - Objectives: While anatomical and physiological changes in the spleen are reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex autoimmune disease that can affect most organ systems, calcifications have not been described as a characteristic feature. We report 4 lupus patients with extensive splenic calcifications with no apparent cause except for their primary disease. The relevant literature on calcifications of the spleen in SLE is also reviewed. Methods: Four lupus patients with extensive splenic calcifications are described, identified by radiologists at 2 large urban academic centers. In addition, the relevant literature was reviewed (PubMed search 1947 through May 2010) using the following terms: "lupus," "spleen," and "calcified," "calcification," "calcifications," or "microcalcifications." English-language case reports and series were selected. Results: Four lupus patients were found to have a unique pattern of splenic calcifications. The age range was 36 to 73 years. Two of the patients were women, and 1 of these had SLE and limited systemic sclerosis. On reviewing the literature, 6 additional cases of lupus and splenic calcifications were found, 1 of which had pathologic assessment of the spleen on autopsy. The incidence of infection was apparently not increased in affected patients. Conclusions: A unique pattern of calcifications of the spleen may be found in lupus patients, which can suggest the diagnosis of the underlying connective tissue disease. Whether splenic calcification can predispose to hyposplenism remains to be determined. While the exact significance of diffuse splenic calcification is still unknown, this unique radiologic finding may be a result of the disease process itself.

AB - Objectives: While anatomical and physiological changes in the spleen are reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex autoimmune disease that can affect most organ systems, calcifications have not been described as a characteristic feature. We report 4 lupus patients with extensive splenic calcifications with no apparent cause except for their primary disease. The relevant literature on calcifications of the spleen in SLE is also reviewed. Methods: Four lupus patients with extensive splenic calcifications are described, identified by radiologists at 2 large urban academic centers. In addition, the relevant literature was reviewed (PubMed search 1947 through May 2010) using the following terms: "lupus," "spleen," and "calcified," "calcification," "calcifications," or "microcalcifications." English-language case reports and series were selected. Results: Four lupus patients were found to have a unique pattern of splenic calcifications. The age range was 36 to 73 years. Two of the patients were women, and 1 of these had SLE and limited systemic sclerosis. On reviewing the literature, 6 additional cases of lupus and splenic calcifications were found, 1 of which had pathologic assessment of the spleen on autopsy. The incidence of infection was apparently not increased in affected patients. Conclusions: A unique pattern of calcifications of the spleen may be found in lupus patients, which can suggest the diagnosis of the underlying connective tissue disease. Whether splenic calcification can predispose to hyposplenism remains to be determined. While the exact significance of diffuse splenic calcification is still unknown, this unique radiologic finding may be a result of the disease process itself.

KW - Calcifications

KW - Imaging

KW - Microcalcifications

KW - Spleen

KW - Systemic lupus erythematosus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80755163583&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80755163583&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.semarthrit.2010.10.003

DO - 10.1016/j.semarthrit.2010.10.003

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 187

EP - 193

JO - Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism

JF - Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism

SN - 0049-0172

IS - 2

ER -