Differences in reactivation of tuberculosis induced from anti-tnf treatments are based on bioavailability in granulomatous tissue

Simeone Marino, Dhruv Sud, Hillarie Plessner, Philana Ling Lin, John Chan, JoAnne L. Flynn, Denise E. Kirschner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is complex. Experimental evidence has revealed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a major role in host defense against Mtb in both active and latent phases of infection. TNF-neutralizing drugs used to treat inflammatory disorders have been reported to increase the risk of tuberculosis (TB), in accordance with animal studies. The present study takes a computational approach toward characterizing the role of TNF in protection against the tubercle bacillus in both active and latent infection. We extend our previous mathematical models to investigate the roles and production of soluble (sTNF) and transmembrane TNF (tmTNF). We analyze effects of anti-TNF therapy in virtual clinical trials (VCTs) by simulating two of the most commonly used therapies, anti-TNF antibody and TNF receptor fusion, predicting mechanisms that explain observed differences in TB reactivation rates. The major findings from this study are that bioavailability of TNF following anti-TNF therapy is the primary factor for causing reactivation of latent infection and that sTNF-even at very low levels-is essential for control of infection. Using a mathematical model, it is possible to distinguish mechanisms of action of the anti-TNF treatments and gain insights into the role of TNF in TB control and pathology. Our study suggests that a TNF-modulating agent could be developed that could balance the requirement for reduction of inflammation with the necessity to maintain resistance to infection and microbial diseases. Alternatively, the dose and timing of anti-TNF therapy could be modified. Anti-TNF therapy will likely lead to numerous incidents of primary TB if used in areas where exposure is likely.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1909-1924
Number of pages16
JournalPLoS Computational Biology
Volume3
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Fingerprint

Tumor Necrosis Factor
Tuberculosis
tuberculosis
tumor necrosis factors
reactivation
tumor
Biological Availability
bioavailability
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Tissue
Infection
Therapy
therapeutics
infection
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
necrosis
tissue
tissues
Theoretical Models
mathematical models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Ecology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

Differences in reactivation of tuberculosis induced from anti-tnf treatments are based on bioavailability in granulomatous tissue. / Marino, Simeone; Sud, Dhruv; Plessner, Hillarie; Lin, Philana Ling; Chan, John; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Kirschner, Denise E.

In: PLoS Computational Biology, Vol. 3, No. 10, 10.2007, p. 1909-1924.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marino, Simeone ; Sud, Dhruv ; Plessner, Hillarie ; Lin, Philana Ling ; Chan, John ; Flynn, JoAnne L. ; Kirschner, Denise E. / Differences in reactivation of tuberculosis induced from anti-tnf treatments are based on bioavailability in granulomatous tissue. In: PLoS Computational Biology. 2007 ; Vol. 3, No. 10. pp. 1909-1924.
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