Dietary sugars intake and cardiovascular health a scientific statement from the american heart association

Rachel K. Johnson, Lawrence J. Appel, Michael Brands, Barbara V. Howard, Michael Lefevre, Robert H. Lustig, Frank Sacks, Lyn M. Steffen, Judith Wylie-Rosett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

669 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High intakes of dietary sugars in the setting of a worldwide pandemic of obesity and cardiovascular disease have heightened concerns about the adverse effects of excessive consumption of sugars. In 2001 to 2004, the usual intake of added sugars for Americans was 22.2 teaspoons per day (355 calories per day). Between 1970 and 2005, average annual availability of sugars/added sugars increased by 19%, which added 76 calories to Americans' average daily energy intake. Soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages are the primary source of added sugars in Americans' diets. Excessive consumption of sugars has been linked with several metabolic abnormalities and adverse health conditions, as well as shortfalls of essential nutrients. Although trial data are limited, evidence from observational studies indicates that a higher intake of soft drinks is associated with greater energy intake, higher body weight, and lower intake of essential nutrients. National survey data also indicate that excessive consumption of added sugars is contributing to overconsumption of discretionary calories by Americans. On the basis of the 2005 US Dietary Guidelines, intake of added sugars greatly exceeds discretionary calorie allowances, regardless of energy needs. In view of these considerations, the American Heart Association recommends reductions in the intake of added sugars. A prudent upper limit of intake is half of the discretionary calorie allowance, which for most American women is no more than 100 calories per day and for most American men is no more than 150 calories per day from added sugars.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1011-1020
Number of pages10
JournalCirculation
Volume120
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dietary Sucrose
American Heart Association
Carbonated Beverages
Energy Intake
Food
Nutrition Policy
Beverages
Health
Pandemics
Observational Studies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Obesity
Body Weight
Diet

Keywords

  • Aha scientific statements
  • Beverages
  • Carbohydrates
  • Carbonated beverages
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Diet
  • Dietary
  • Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Dietary sugars intake and cardiovascular health a scientific statement from the american heart association. / Johnson, Rachel K.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Brands, Michael; Howard, Barbara V.; Lefevre, Michael; Lustig, Robert H.; Sacks, Frank; Steffen, Lyn M.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith.

In: Circulation, Vol. 120, No. 11, 2009, p. 1011-1020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, RK, Appel, LJ, Brands, M, Howard, BV, Lefevre, M, Lustig, RH, Sacks, F, Steffen, LM & Wylie-Rosett, J 2009, 'Dietary sugars intake and cardiovascular health a scientific statement from the american heart association', Circulation, vol. 120, no. 11, pp. 1011-1020. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.192627
Johnson, Rachel K. ; Appel, Lawrence J. ; Brands, Michael ; Howard, Barbara V. ; Lefevre, Michael ; Lustig, Robert H. ; Sacks, Frank ; Steffen, Lyn M. ; Wylie-Rosett, Judith. / Dietary sugars intake and cardiovascular health a scientific statement from the american heart association. In: Circulation. 2009 ; Vol. 120, No. 11. pp. 1011-1020.
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