Dietary factors and risk of breast cancer

Combined analysis of 12 case-control studies

Geoffrey R. Howe, Tomio Hirohata, T. Gregory Hislop, Jose Mario Iscovich, Jian Min Yuan, Klea Katsouyanni, Flora Lubin, Ettore Marubini, Baruch Modan, Thomas E. Rohan, Paolo Toniolo, Yu Shunzhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

649 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted a combined analysis of the original data to evaluate the consistency of 12 case-control studies of diet and breast cancer. Our analysis shows a consistent, statistically significant, positive association between breast cancer risk and saturated fat intake in postmenopausal women (relative risk for highest vs. lowest quintile, 1.46; P < .0001). A consistent protective effect for a number of markers of fruit and vegetable intake was demonstrated; vitamin C intake had the most consistent and statistically significant inverse association with breast cancer risk (relative risk for highest vs. lowest quintile, 0.69; P < .0001). If these dietary associations represent causality, the attributable risk (i.e., the percentage of breast cancers that might be prevented by dietary modification) in the North American population is estimated to be 24% for postmenopausal women and 16% for premenopausal women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-569
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume82
Issue number7
StatePublished - Apr 4 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Case-control Study
Breast Cancer
Case-Control Studies
Quintile
Breast Neoplasms
Relative Risk
Lowest
Attributable Risk
Fruit
Diet Therapy
Causality
Vitamins
Vegetables
Percentage
Nutrition
Fruits
Oils and fats
Ascorbic Acid
Fats
Factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Howe, G. R., Hirohata, T., Hislop, T. G., Iscovich, J. M., Yuan, J. M., Katsouyanni, K., ... Shunzhang, Y. (1990). Dietary factors and risk of breast cancer: Combined analysis of 12 case-control studies. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 82(7), 561-569.

Dietary factors and risk of breast cancer : Combined analysis of 12 case-control studies. / Howe, Geoffrey R.; Hirohata, Tomio; Hislop, T. Gregory; Iscovich, Jose Mario; Yuan, Jian Min; Katsouyanni, Klea; Lubin, Flora; Marubini, Ettore; Modan, Baruch; Rohan, Thomas E.; Toniolo, Paolo; Shunzhang, Yu.

In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 82, No. 7, 04.04.1990, p. 561-569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Howe, GR, Hirohata, T, Hislop, TG, Iscovich, JM, Yuan, JM, Katsouyanni, K, Lubin, F, Marubini, E, Modan, B, Rohan, TE, Toniolo, P & Shunzhang, Y 1990, 'Dietary factors and risk of breast cancer: Combined analysis of 12 case-control studies', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 82, no. 7, pp. 561-569.
Howe GR, Hirohata T, Hislop TG, Iscovich JM, Yuan JM, Katsouyanni K et al. Dietary factors and risk of breast cancer: Combined analysis of 12 case-control studies. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1990 Apr 4;82(7):561-569.
Howe, Geoffrey R. ; Hirohata, Tomio ; Hislop, T. Gregory ; Iscovich, Jose Mario ; Yuan, Jian Min ; Katsouyanni, Klea ; Lubin, Flora ; Marubini, Ettore ; Modan, Baruch ; Rohan, Thomas E. ; Toniolo, Paolo ; Shunzhang, Yu. / Dietary factors and risk of breast cancer : Combined analysis of 12 case-control studies. In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1990 ; Vol. 82, No. 7. pp. 561-569.
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