Dietary assessment in epidemiology: Comparison of a food frequency and a diet history questionnaire with a 7-day food record

Meera Jain, Geoffrey R. Howe, Thomas Rohan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Scopus citations

Abstract

The validity of two types of diet assessment methods, a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and an interviewer-administered detailed diet history, was assessed relative to a 7-day food record on a population-based sample of 95 men and 108 women in Toronto, Canada, between May 1989 and July 1990. Each study subject completed both questionnaire methods, a food frequency questionnaire and an interviewer-administered diet history, as well as a 7-day food record in a crossover design. Data were analyzed for both unadjusted and energy-adjusted nutrients to estimate Pearson's and intraclass correlations and agreement within categories. Mean values for the intake of most nutrients assessed by the two questionnaire methods were similar. Average, energy-adjusted Pearson's correlation coefficients for men between a food frequency questionnaire and a 7-day food record were 0.55 for macronutrients and 0.48 for micronutrients compared with 0.47 for macro- and 0.48 for micronutrients between an interviewer-administered diet history and a 7-day food record. For women, they were 0.48 for macro- and 0.54 for micronutrients between a food frequency questionnaire and a 7-day food record and 0.46 and 0.49, respectively, between an interviewer-administered diet history and a 7-day food record. The energy-adjusted Pearson correlations were generally higher than were the energy-unadjusted Pearson correlations and the intraclass correlations. The present study suggests that a food frequency questionnaire is comparable with an interviewer-administered diet history as a predictor of nutrients as estimated from a 7-day food record.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)953-960
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume143
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • diet
  • diet surveys
  • epidemiologic methods
  • questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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